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Association between vestibulo-ocular reflex suppression, balance, gait, and fall risk in ageing and neurodegenerative disease: protocol of a one-year prospective follow-up study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, October 2015
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3 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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232 Mendeley
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Title
Association between vestibulo-ocular reflex suppression, balance, gait, and fall risk in ageing and neurodegenerative disease: protocol of a one-year prospective follow-up study
Published in
BMC Neurology, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12883-015-0447-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karin Srulijes, David J. Mack, Jochen Klenk, Lars Schwickert, Espen A. F. Ihlen, Michael Schwenk, Ulrich Lindemann, Miriam Meyer, Srijana K.C., Markus A. Hobert, Kathrin Brockmann, Isabel Wurster, Jörn K. Pomper, Matthis Synofzik, Erich Schneider, Uwe Ilg, Daniela Berg, Walter Maetzler, Clemens Becker

Abstract

Falls frequency increases with age and particularly in neurogeriatric cohorts. The interplay between eye movements and locomotion may contribute substantially to the occurrence of falls, but is hardly investigated. This paper provides an overview of current approaches to simultaneously measure eye and body movements, particularly for analyzing the association of vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) suppression, postural deficits and falls in neurogeriatric risk cohorts. Moreover, VOR suppression is measured during head-fixed target presentation and during gaze shifting while postural control is challenged. Using these approaches, we aim at identifying quantitative parameters of eye-head-coordination during postural balance and gait, as indicators of fall risk. Patients with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) or Parkinson's disease (PD), age- and sex-matched healthy older adults, and a cohort of young healthy adults will be recruited. Baseline assessment will include a detailed clinical assessment, covering medical history, neurological examination, disease specific clinical rating scales, falls-related self-efficacy, activities of daily living, neuro-psychological screening, assessment of mobility function and a questionnaire for retrospective falls. Moreover, participants will simultaneously perform eye and head movements (fixating a head-fixed target vs. shifting gaze to light emitting diodes in order to quantify vestibulo-ocular reflex suppression ability) under different conditions (sitting, standing, or walking). An eye/head tracker synchronized with a 3-D motion analysis system will be used to quantify parameters related to eye-head-coordination, postural balance, and gait. Established outcome parameters related to VOR suppression ability (e.g., gain, saccadic reaction time, frequency of saccades) and motor related fall risk (e.g., step-time variability, postural sway) will be calculated. Falls will be assessed prospectively over 12 months via protocols and monthly telephone interviews. This study protocol describes an experimental setup allowing the analysis of simultaneously assessed eye, head and body movements. Results will improve our understanding of the influence of the interplay between eye, head and body movements on falls in geriatric high-risk cohorts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 232 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 226 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 34 15%
Researcher 33 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 22 9%
Other 17 7%
Other 53 23%
Unknown 42 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 51 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 43 19%
Neuroscience 32 14%
Psychology 13 6%
Engineering 12 5%
Other 26 11%
Unknown 55 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2016.
All research outputs
#13,957,299
of 22,830,751 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#1,176
of 2,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,311
of 278,742 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#28
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,830,751 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,435 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,742 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.