↓ Skip to main content

Reading the mind of children in response to food advertising: a cross-sectional study of Malaysian schoolchildren’s attitudes towards food and beverages advertising on television

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
159 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Reading the mind of children in response to food advertising: a cross-sectional study of Malaysian schoolchildren’s attitudes towards food and beverages advertising on television
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2392-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

See Hoe Ng, Bridget Kelly, Chee Hee Se, Sharmela Sahathevan, Karuthan Chinna, Mohd Noor Ismail, Tilakavati Karupaiah

Abstract

Television food advertising (TVFA) is the most dominant medium in the obesogenic environment promoting unhealthy food choices in children. This cross-sectional study investigated children's attitudes towards TVFA by examining four well-cited induction factors namely advertisement recognition, favourite advertisement, purchase request, and product preference. Malaysian urban schoolchildren (7 to 12 years) of equal ethnic distribution were voluntarily recruited (n = 402). Questionnaire administration was facilitated using a food album of 24 advertised food products. Majority of children were older (66.2 %), girls (56.7 %) with one-third either overweight or obese. TV viewing time for weekend was greater than weekdays (4.77 ± 2.60 vs 2.35 ± 1.40 h/day) and Malay children spent more time watching TV compared to Chinese (p < 0.001) and Indian (p < 0.05) children. Chinese children spent significantly more time surfing the internet compared to either Malay or Indian (p < 0.01). Median score trend was advertisement recognition > favourite advertisement and product preference > purchase request, and significantly greater (p < 0.001) for non-core than core food advertisements. TV viewing time and ethnicity significantly influenced all induction factors for non-core foods. After correcting for all influencing factors, 'favourite advertisement' (IRRfinal adj: 1.06; 95 % CI: 1.04 to 1.08), 'purchase request' (IRRfinal adj: 1.06; 95 % CI: 1.04 to 1.08) and 'product preference' (IRRfinal adj: 1.04; 95 % CI: 1.02 to 1.07) still were significantly associated with TV viewing time. For every additional hour of TV viewing, the incidence rates increased significantly by 1.04 to 1.06 for 'favourite advertisement', 'purchase request' and 'product preference' related to non-core foods amongst Malay and Indian children. However, Chinese children only demonstrated a significant association between TV viewing time and 'favourite advertisement' (IRRadj: 1.06; 95 % CI: 1.01 to 1.10). This study highlights TVFA as a powerful medium predisposing the mind of children to non-core foods through appealing TV commercials, promoting purchase request and generating unhealthy food preferences in early childhood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 159 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 158 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 23%
Student > Bachelor 34 21%
Researcher 11 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 7%
Student > Postgraduate 7 4%
Other 27 17%
Unknown 33 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 34 21%
Social Sciences 28 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 5%
Arts and Humanities 4 3%
Other 20 13%
Unknown 43 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,870,408
of 13,055,439 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,159
of 8,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,008
of 251,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,055,439 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,945 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,432 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them