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Structured follow-up by general practitioners after deliberate self-poisoning: a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, October 2015
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Title
Structured follow-up by general practitioners after deliberate self-poisoning: a randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0635-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

TK Grimholt, D. Jacobsen, OR Haavet, L. Sandvik, T. Jorgensen, AB Norheim, O. Ekeberg

Abstract

General Practitioners (GPs) play an important role in the follow-up of patients after deliberate self-poisoning (DSP). The aim was to examine whether structured follow-up by GPs increased the content of, adherence to, and satisfaction with treatment after discharge from emergency departments. This was a multicentre, randomised trial with blinded assignment. Five emergency departments and general practices in the catchment area participated. 202 patients discharged from emergency departments after DSP were assigned. The intervention was structured follow-up by the GP over a 6-month period with a minimum of five consultations, accompanied by written guidelines for the GPs with suggestions for motivating patients to follow treatment, assessing personal problems and suicidal ideation, and availability in the case of suicidal crisis. Outcome measures were data retrieved from the Register for the control and payment of reimbursements to health service providers (KUHR) and by questionnaires mailed to patients and GPs. After 3 and 6 months, the frequency and content of GP contact, and adherence to GP consultations and treatment in general were registered. Satisfaction with general treatment received and with the GP was measured by the EUROPEP scale. Patients in the intervention group received significantly more consultations than the control group (mean 6.7 vs. 4.5 (p = 0.004)). The intervention group was significantly more satisfied with the time their GP took to listen to their personal problems (93.1 % vs. 59.4 % (p = 0.002)) and with the fact that the GP included them in medical decisions (87.5 % vs. 54. 8 % (p = 0.009)). The intervention group was significantly more satisfied with the treatment in general than the control group (79 % vs. 51 % (p = 0.026)). Guidelines and structured, enhanced follow-up by the GP after the discharge of the DSP patient increased the number of consultations and satisfaction with aftercare in general practice. Consistently with previous research, there is still a need for interventional studies. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01342809 . Registered 18 April 2011.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 22%
Student > Master 11 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Researcher 4 7%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 17 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 15%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 13 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2015.
All research outputs
#12,839,385
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,929
of 3,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#209,374
of 253,810 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
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