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Client perceptions of the mental health engagement network: a qualitative analysis of an electronic personal health record

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, October 2015
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Title
Client perceptions of the mental health engagement network: a qualitative analysis of an electronic personal health record
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0614-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cheryl Forchuk, Jeffrey P. Reiss, Tony O’Regan, Paige Ethridge, Lorie Donelle, Abraham Rudnick

Abstract

Information technologies such as websites, mobile phone applications, and virtual reality programs have been shown to deliver innovative and effective treatments for mental illness. Much of the research studying electronic mental health interventions focuses on symptom reduction; however, to facilitate the implementation of electronic interventions in usual mental health care, it is also important to investigate the perceptions of clients who will be using the technologies. To this end, a qualitative analysis of focus group discussions regarding the Mental Health Engagement Network, a web-based personal health record and smartphone intervention, is presented here. Individuals living in the community with a mood or psychotic disorder (n = 394) were provided with a smartphone and access to an electronic personal health record, the Lawson SMART Record, for 12 to 18 months to manage their mental health. This study employed a delayed-implementation design and obtained both quantitative and qualitative data through individual interviews and focus group sessions. Participants had the opportunity to participate in voluntary focus group sessions at three points throughout the study to discuss their perceptions of the technologies. Qualitative data from 95 focus group participants were analysed using a thematic analysis. Four overarching themes emerged from focus group discussions: 1) Versatile functionality of the Lawson SMART Record and smartphone facilitated use; 2) Aspects of the technologies as barriers to use; 3) Use of the Mental health Engagement Network technologies resulted in perceived positive outcomes; 4) Future enhancement of the Lawson SMART Record and intervention is recommended. These qualitative data provide a valuable contribution to the understanding of how smarttechnologies can be integrated into usual mental health care. Smartphones are extremely portable andcommonplace in society. Therefore, clients can use these devices to manage and track mental health issuesin any place at almost any time without feeling stigmatized. Assessing clients' perspectives regarding the use of smart technologies in mental health care provides an invaluable addition to the current literature. Qualitative findings support the feasibility of implementing a smartphone and electronic personal health record intervention with individuals who are living in the community and experiencing a mental illness, and provide considerations for future development and implementation.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 284 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 280 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 54 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 13%
Researcher 35 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 28 10%
Student > Bachelor 26 9%
Other 48 17%
Unknown 55 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 76 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 46 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 41 14%
Computer Science 20 7%
Arts and Humanities 8 3%
Other 30 11%
Unknown 63 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2015.
All research outputs
#19,013,639
of 21,365,584 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#3,892
of 4,365 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,169
of 268,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
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