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An observational study of the association between microalbuminuria and increased N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Intensive Care, October 2015
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4 tweeters

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3 Dimensions

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Title
An observational study of the association between microalbuminuria and increased N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage
Published in
Journal of Intensive Care, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40560-015-0108-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoshiaki Terao, Makito Oji, Tomomi Toyoda, Haruka Inoue, Makoto Fukusaki, Tetsuya Hara

Abstract

The urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) is a significant neurologic prognostic predictor in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) plays an important role in body fluid regulation in patients with SAH. The present study was performed to determine whether ACR was independent predictor for unfavorable neurological outcome and ACR was associated with increased N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP) after SAH. We studied 61 patients undergoing surgery who were admitted within 48 h after aneurysmal SAH onset between July 2008 and June 2010. Hunt and Hess grade and Fisher grade were recorded at admission. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was calculated at admission and daily for seven postoperative days. Arterial blood was sampled at admission and for seven postoperative days to determine the PaO2/FIO2 ratio, C-reactive protein level, troponin I level, and NT-pro-BNP level. Urine was sampled at admission and daily for seven postoperative days to determine ACR and vanillylmandelic acid/creatinine ratio (VMACR). Neurological outcomes were assessed at hospital discharge by using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for the predictive variables of unfavorable neurological outcomes, and the area under the curve (AUC) was determined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed for the significant predictors of unfavorable neurological outcomes after SAH. Associations with NT-pro-BNP were evaluated by using the Spearman rank correlation test. Of the 61 patients, 24 had unfavorable outcomes. The prevalence rate of microalbuminuria was 85 % (52/61). The highest NT-pro-BNP levels were above the normal range in 57 of 61 patients (93 %). According to the AUC, the Hunt and Hess grade, GCS score, the highest ACR, and highest VMACR were significant predictors of neurological outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that the highest ACR and Hunt and Hess grade are independent prognostic predictors of unfavorable neurological outcomes. The highest NT-pro-BNP significantly correlated with the highest troponin I, highest ACR, and VMACR on admission. The highest ACR is an independent prognostic predictor of unfavorable neurological outcomes after SAH. Moreover, plasma NT-pro-BNP elevation may be associated with the development of microalbuminuria.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 21%
Student > Bachelor 2 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 14%
Student > Master 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Unknown 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 50%
Neuroscience 2 14%
Arts and Humanities 1 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Unknown 3 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2015.
All research outputs
#9,001,076
of 15,356,802 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Intensive Care
#230
of 356 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,151
of 254,874 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Intensive Care
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,356,802 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 356 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,874 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them