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Intake of high fructose corn syrup sweetened soft drinks is associated with prevalent chronic bronchitis in U.S. Adults, ages 20–55 y

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, October 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
36 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
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Title
Intake of high fructose corn syrup sweetened soft drinks is associated with prevalent chronic bronchitis in U.S. Adults, ages 20–55 y
Published in
Nutrition Journal, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12937-015-0097-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luanne Robalo DeChristopher, Jaime Uribarri, Katherine L. Tucker

Abstract

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) sweetened soft drink intake has been linked with asthma in US high-schoolers. Intake of beverages with excess free fructose (EFF), including apple juice, and HFCS sweetened fruit drinks and soft drinks, has been associated with asthma in children. One hypothesis for this association is that underlying fructose malabsorption and fructose reactivity in the GI may contribute to in situ formation of enFruAGEs. EnFruAGEs may be an overlooked source of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) that contribute to lung disease. AGE/ RAGEs are elevated in COPD lungs. EFF intake has increased in recent decades, and intakes may exceed dosages associated with adult fructose malabsorption in subsets of the population. Intestinal dysfunction has been shown to be elevated in COPD patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between HFCS sweetened soft drink intake and chronic bronchitis (CB), a common manifestation of COPD, in adults. Design: In this cross sectional analysis, the outcome variable was self-reported existing chronic bronchitis or history of CB. Exposure variable was non-diet soda. Rao Scott Ҳ(2) was used for prevalence differences and logistic regression for associations, adjusted for age, sex, race-ethnicity, BMI, smoking, exposure to in-home smoking, pre-diabetes, diabetes, SES, total energy and total fruits and beverages consumption. Data are from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006. 2801 adults aged 20-55 y. There was a statistically significant correlation between intake of non-diet soft drinks and greater prevalence and odds of chronic bronchitis (p < 0.05). Independent of all covariates, intake of non-diet soda ≥5 times a week (vs. non/low non-diet soda) was associated with nearly twice the likelihood of having chronic bronchitis (OR = 1.80; p = 0.047; 95 % CI 1.01-3.20). HFCS sweetened soft drink intake is correlated with chronic bronchitis in US adults aged 20-55 y, after adjusting for covariates, including smoking. Results support the hypothesis that underlying fructose malabsorption and fructose reactivity in the GI may contribute to chronic bronchitis, perhaps through in situ formation of enFruAGEs, which may contribute to lung disease. Longitudinal and biochemical research is needed to confirm and clarify the mechanisms involved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 36 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 84 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 19%
Student > Master 13 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Researcher 6 7%
Other 25 29%
Unknown 8 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 14 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 33. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2020.
All research outputs
#713,980
of 16,775,501 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#225
of 1,272 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,548
of 288,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#43
of 198 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,775,501 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,272 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,485 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 198 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.