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Hunters and hunting across indigenous and colonist communities at the forest-agriculture interface: an ethnozoological study from the Peruvian Amazon

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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101 Mendeley
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Title
Hunters and hunting across indigenous and colonist communities at the forest-agriculture interface: an ethnozoological study from the Peruvian Amazon
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13002-018-0247-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wendy Francesconi, Vincent Bax, Genowefa Blundo-Canto, Simon Willcock, Sandra Cuadros, Martha Vanegas, Marcela Quintero, Carlos A. Torres-Vitolas

Abstract

Wildlife has been traditionally used by forest communities as a source of protein, and the Peruvian Amazon is no exception. The articulation of colonist and indigenous communities to urban centers and markets results in changes in livelihood strategies and impacts on wildlife populations. To address the threat of overhunting and forest conversion, we provide a generalized characterization of colonist and indigenous communities and their hunting activities near Pucallpa, Ucayali, Peru. A semi-structured household survey was conducted to characterize hunters and describe their prey collections. The data were analyzed by conducting a Kruskal-Wallis test, a multiple regression analysis, and by estimating the harvest rate (H). Less wealthy households were more actively engaged in hunting for food security and as a livelihood strategy. Additionally, older hunters were associated with higher hunting rates. Although the percentage of hunters was relatively low, estimated hunting rates suggest overharvesting of wildlife. Lowland pacas (Cuniculus paca) were the most frequently hunted prey, followed by red brocket deer (Mazama americana) and primates. While hunting intensity was not significantly different between indigenous and colonist communities, hunting rate disparities suggest there are different types of hunters (specialized vs. opportunistic) and that prey composition differs between communities. Close monitoring of wildlife populations and hunting activities is ideal for more accurately determining the impact of hunting on wildlife population and in turn on forest health. In lack of this type of information, this study provides insight of hunting as a shifting livelihood strategy in a rapidly changing environment at the forest/agriculture frontier.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 101 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 16%
Researcher 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 21 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 25%
Environmental Science 22 22%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 3%
Other 17 17%
Unknown 25 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2019.
All research outputs
#7,435,864
of 14,091,489 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#308
of 603 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,287
of 272,872 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,091,489 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 603 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,872 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them