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Dignity and respect during pregnancy and childbirth: a survey of the experience of disabled women

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
35 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
133 Mendeley
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Title
Dignity and respect during pregnancy and childbirth: a survey of the experience of disabled women
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12884-018-1950-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jenny Hall, Vanora Hundley, Bethan Collins, Jillian Ireland

Abstract

Despite the increasing number of women with disability globally becoming pregnant, there is currently limited research about their experiences. A national survey of women's experience of dignity and respect during pregnancy and childbirth raised concerns about the possibility of women with disability having unequal care with overall less choice and control. To address this further we conducted a study to explore the experiences of dignity and respect in childbirth of women with disability. The study involved a self-selecting, convenience sample of 37 women who had given birth in the United Kingdom and Ireland and had completed an internet-based survey. Women were identified through online networks and groups of and for disabled parents and for people with specific medical conditions. Data were collected using an online survey tool. Survey data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Thematic analysis was used for open questions. Despite generally positive responses, just over half of the group of women expressed dissatisfaction with care provision. Only 19% thought that reasonable adjustments or accommodations had been made for them (7/37). When reasonable adjustments were not in place, participants' independence and dignity were undermined. More than a quarter of women felt they were treated less favourably because of their disability (10/37, 27%). At all points in the pregnancy continuum more than a quarter of women felt their rights were either poorly or very poorly respected; however this was greatest in the postnatal period (11/35, 31%). In addition, more than half of the women (20/36, 56%) felt that maternity care providers did not have appropriate awareness of or attitudes to disability. Women's experiences of dignity and respect in childbirth revealed that a significant proportion of women felt their rights were poorly respected and that they were treated less favourably because of their disability. This suggests that there is a need to look more closely at individualised care. It was also evident that more consideration is required to improve attitudes of maternity care providers to disability and services need to adapt to provide reasonable adjustments to accommodate disability, including improving continuity of carer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 133 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 21%
Student > Bachelor 19 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 6%
Researcher 7 5%
Student > Postgraduate 5 4%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 47 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 42 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 11%
Social Sciences 10 8%
Psychology 3 2%
Arts and Humanities 2 2%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 51 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2021.
All research outputs
#1,199,538
of 21,453,375 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#271
of 3,878 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,776
of 298,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,453,375 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,878 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,225 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them