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Clonal raider ant brain transcriptomics identifies candidate molecular mechanisms for reproductive division of labor

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
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Title
Clonal raider ant brain transcriptomics identifies candidate molecular mechanisms for reproductive division of labor
Published in
BMC Biology, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12915-018-0558-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Romain Libbrecht, Peter R. Oxley, Daniel J. C. Kronauer

Abstract

Division of labor between reproductive queens and workers that perform brood care is a hallmark of insect societies. However, studies of the molecular basis of this fundamental dichotomy are limited by the fact that the caste of an individual cannot typically be experimentally manipulated at the adult stage. Here we take advantage of the unique biology of the clonal raider ant, Ooceraea biroi, to study brain gene expression dynamics during experimentally induced transitions between reproductive and brood care behavior. Introducing larvae that inhibit reproduction and induce brood care behavior causes much faster changes in adult gene expression than removing larvae. In addition, the general patterns of gene expression differ depending on whether ants transition from reproduction to brood care or vice versa, indicating that gene expression changes between phases are cyclic rather than pendular. Finally, we identify genes that could play upstream roles in regulating reproduction and behavior because they show large and early expression changes in one or both transitions. Our analyses reveal that the nature and timing of gene expression changes differ substantially depending on the direction of the transition, and identify a suite of promising candidate molecular regulators of reproductive division of labor that can now be characterized further in both social and solitary animal models. This study contributes to understanding the molecular regulation of reproduction and behavior, as well as the organization and evolution of insect societies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Researcher 8 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 6%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 13 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 54%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 17%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Environmental Science 1 1%
Psychology 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 15 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2018.
All research outputs
#386,747
of 13,804,624 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#90
of 1,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,792
of 270,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,804,624 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,206 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,489 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them