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Perceptions of the preparedness of medical graduates for internship responsibilities in district hospitals in Kenya: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, October 2015
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Title
Perceptions of the preparedness of medical graduates for internship responsibilities in district hospitals in Kenya: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Medical Education, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12909-015-0463-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patricia N. Muthaura, Tashmin Khamis, Mushtaq Ahmed, Syeda Ra’ana Hussain

Abstract

Aga Khan University is developing its undergraduate medical education curriculum for East Africa. In Kenya, a 1 year internship is mandatory for medical graduates' registration as practitioners. The majority of approved internship training sites are at district hospitals. The purposes of this study were to determine: (1) whether recent Kenyan medical graduates are prepared for their roles as interns in district hospitals upon graduation from medical school; (2) what working and training conditions and social support interns are likely to face in district hospital; and (3) what aspects of the undergraduate curriculum need to be addressed to overcome perceived deficiencies in interns' competencies. Focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews were conducted with current interns and clinical supervisors in seven district hospitals in Kenya. Perceptions of both interns and supervisors regarding interns' responsibilities and skills, working conditions at district hospitals, and improvements required in medical education were obtained. Findings included agreement across informants on deficiencies in interns' practical skills and experience of managing clinical challenges. Supervisors were generally critical regarding interns' competencies, whereas interns were more specific about their weaknesses. Supervisor expectations were higher in relation to surgical procedures than those of interns. There was agreement on the limited learning, clinical facilities and social support available at district hospitals including, according to interns, inadequate supervision. Supervisors felt they provided adequate supervision and that interns lacked the ability to initiate communication with them. Both groups indicated transition challenges from medical school to medical practice attributable to inadequate practical experience. They indicated the need for more direct patient care responsibilities and clinical experience at a district hospital during undergraduate training. Perception of medical graduates' unpreparedness seemed to stem from a failure to implement the apprenticeship model of learning in medical school and lack of prior exposure to district hospitals. These findings will inform curriculum development to meet stakeholder requirements, improve the quality of graduates, and increase satisfaction with transition to practice.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
Unknown 124 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 17%
Student > Bachelor 17 14%
Researcher 12 10%
Other 6 5%
Lecturer 5 4%
Other 29 23%
Unknown 35 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 46 37%
Social Sciences 11 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 9%
Psychology 4 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 39 31%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2015.
All research outputs
#18,429,163
of 22,830,751 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#2,742
of 3,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,717
of 283,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#51
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,830,751 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,322 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,225 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.