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Pathological variations in mummified feet between two near-distance/long-time populations in Ancient Egypt

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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11 Mendeley
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Title
Pathological variations in mummified feet between two near-distance/long-time populations in Ancient Egypt
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13047-015-0115-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Albert Isidro, Beatrice Huber, Aamer Malik, Assumpció Malgosa

Abstract

In ancient populations, a significant quantity of foot pathology was related either to the type of footwear they used or the underlying terrain they walked on. Our study was carried out to analyze these parameters with the foot pathologies the mummies presented. Between 2006 and 2012, more than 650 individuals were recovered from the Sharuna and Qarara necropolis (Middle Egypt) dating from the VIth Dynasty of the first Ptolemaic Period to the second Coptic Period. From among them, a total of 73 mummified feet (41 from Sharuna and 32 from Qarara) were studied. We took into account the differences existing between both sites in location (15 km apart) and in time (2500 years apart). Almost all feet from Sharuna were wrapped and impregnated with a preservative substance (anthropological mummification), while the mummification process in Qarara was quite natural. Pathologies were found in 36 of the 73 ft (20 from Sharuna and 16 from Qarara). The differences in foot pathologies between the two sites were analysed. The foot pathologies we found in both necropolises have led us to hypothesise that the majority of the diachronic differences could be related more to progressive changes in the type of the terrain brought out through droughts, than the changes in footwear habits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Researcher 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 27%
Psychology 1 9%
Arts and Humanities 1 9%
Unknown 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 October 2015.
All research outputs
#3,089,915
of 13,490,216 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#260
of 543 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,572
of 283,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#34
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,490,216 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 543 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,041 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.