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Intestinal decolonization of Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL): a retrospective observational study in patients at risk for infection and a brief review of the…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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2 patents

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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90 Mendeley
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Title
Intestinal decolonization of Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL): a retrospective observational study in patients at risk for infection and a brief review of the literature
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1225-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Siegbert Rieg, M. Fabian Küpper, Katja de With, Annerose Serr, Jürgen A. Bohnert, Winfried V. Kern

Abstract

Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) have emerged as an important cause of invasive infection. Targeting the primary (intestinal) niche by decolonization may be a valuable approach to decrease the risk of relapsing infections and to reduce transmission of ESBL-producing enteric pathogens. In a retrospective observational study we evaluated the efficacy of intestinal decolonization treatment using orally administered colistin or other non-absorbable agents given for 2 to 4 weeks in adult patients with previous relapsing infection and persistent intestinal colonization with ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E). Eradication success was defined as negative rectal swab or stool culture at the end of treatment and at follow up-2 weeks after treatment discontinuation. First-line decolonization treatment led to eradication of ESBL-E in 19/45 patients (42 %, 7/18 low-dose [4 × 1 million units] colistin, 3/12 high-dose [4 × 2 million units] colistin, 9/15 rifaximin [2 × 400 mg]), and secondary/salvage treatment was successful in 8/13 patients (62 %, 20 treatment episodes). Late follow-up showed that 7/13 patients (54 %) with successful initial or salvage decolonization became recolonized within 3 months after post-treatment assessment while all eight of the patients failing initial or salvage decolonization treatment with late follow-up remained colonized. A narrative review of the literature confirms the limited efficacy of non-absorbable antibiotics including conventional selective digestive tract decolonization (SDD)-like combination regimens for eradicating multidrug-resistant enteric bacteria from the intestinal tract. At present, there is no clear evidence of a significant decolonization efficacy using single-drug treatment with oral non-absorbable antibiotics. More effective regimens are needed and a better definition of at risk patients is required for planning meaningful randomized controlled studies in this field.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Paraguay 1 1%
Unknown 87 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 22%
Student > Master 12 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 19 21%
Unknown 13 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 19 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2021.
All research outputs
#3,391,679
of 20,099,502 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,035
of 6,905 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,084
of 299,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#90
of 585 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,099,502 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,905 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,120 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 585 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.