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Transcriptional response of honey bee (Apis mellifera) to differential nutritional status and Nosema infection

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Transcriptional response of honey bee (Apis mellifera) to differential nutritional status and Nosema infection
Published in
BMC Genomics, August 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-5007-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Farida Azzouz-Olden, Arthur Hunt, Gloria DeGrandi-Hoffman

Abstract

Bees are confronting several environmental challenges, including the intermingled effects of malnutrition and disease. Intuitively, pollen is the healthiest nutritional choice, however, commercial substitutes, such as Bee-Pro and MegaBee, are widely used. Herein we examined how feeding natural and artificial diets shapes transcription in the abdomen of the honey bee, and how transcription shifts in combination with Nosema parasitism. Gene ontology enrichment revealed that, compared with poor diet (carbohydrates [C]), bees fed pollen (P > C), Bee-Pro (B > C), and MegaBee (M > C) showed a broad upregulation of metabolic processes, especially lipids; however, pollen feeding promoted more functions, and superior proteolysis. The superiority of the pollen diet was also evident through the remarkable overexpression of vitellogenin in bees fed pollen instead of MegaBee or Bee-Pro. Upregulation of bioprocesses under carbohydrates feeding compared to pollen (C > P) provided a clear poor nutritional status, uncovering stark expression changes that were slight or absent relatively to Bee-Pro (C > B) or MegaBee (C > M). Poor diet feeding (C > P) induced starvation response genes and hippo signaling pathway, while it repressed growth through different mechanisms. Carbohydrate feeding (C > P) also elicited 'adult behavior', and developmental processes suggesting transition to foraging. Finally, it altered the 'circadian rhythm', reflecting the role of this mechanism in the adaptation to nutritional stress in mammals. Nosema-infected bees fed pollen compared to carbohydrates (PN > CN) upheld certain bioprocesses of uninfected bees (P > C). Poor nutritional status was more apparent against pollen (CN > PN) than Bee-Pro (CN > BN) or MegaBee (CN > MN). Nosema accentuated the effects of malnutrition since more starvation-response genes and stress response mechanisms were upregulated in CN > PN compared to C > P. The bioprocess 'Macromolecular complex assembly' was also enriched in CN > PN, and involved genes associated with human HIV and/or influenza, thus providing potential candidates for bee-Nosema interactions. Finally, the enzyme Duox emerged as essential for guts defense in bees, similarly to Drosophila. These results provide evidence of the superior nutritional status of bees fed pollen instead of artificial substitutes in terms of overall health, even in the presence of a pathogen.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Researcher 9 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 12 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 20 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2018.
All research outputs
#6,924,946
of 13,465,538 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#3,209
of 7,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,874
of 267,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#4
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,465,538 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,897 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,657 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.