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Surgeon-performed ultrasound guided fine-needle aspirate biopsy with report of learning curve; a consecutive case-series study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, October 2015
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Title
Surgeon-performed ultrasound guided fine-needle aspirate biopsy with report of learning curve; a consecutive case-series study
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40463-015-0099-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vinay T. Fernandes, Robert J. De Santis, Danny J. Enepekides, Kevin M. Higgins

Abstract

Fine-needle aspiration biopsy has become the standard of care for the evaluation of thyroid nodules. More recently, the use of ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (UG-FNAB) has improved adequacy of sampling. Now there has been improved access to UG-FNAB as ultrasound technology has become more accessible. Here we review the adequacy rate and learning curve of a single surgeon starting at the adoption of UG-FNAB into surgical practice. UG-FNABs performed at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre from 2010 to 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Nodule characteristics were recorded along with cytopathology and final pathology reports. Chi-square analysis, followed by the reporting of odds ratios with confidence intervals, were used to assess the statistical significance and frequencies, respectively, of nodule characteristics amongst both diagnostic and non-diagnostic samples. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine if any nodule characteristic were predictive of adequacy of UG-FNABs. The learning curve was assessed by calculating the eventual adequacy rates across each year, and its statistical significance was measured using Fischer's Exact Test. In total 423 biopsies were reviewed in 289 patients. The average nodule size was 23.05 mm. When examining if each patient eventually received a diagnostic UG-FNAB, regardless of the number attempts, adequacy was seen to increase from 70.8 % in 2010 to, 81.0 % in 2011, 90.3 % in 2012, 85.7 % in 2013, 89.7 % in 2014, and 94.3 % in 2015 (Fischer's Exact Test, p = 0.049). Cystic (χ(2) = 19.70, p <0.001) nodules were found to yield higher rates of non-diagnostic samples, and their absence are predictive of obtaining an adequate biopsy as seen in a multiple regression analysis (p < 0.001) Adequacy of repeat biopsies following an initial non-diagnostic sample was 75.0 %. Surgeons are capable of performing UG-FNAB with a learning curve noted to achieve standard adequacy rates. Cystic nodules are shown to yield more non-diagnostic samples in the surgeon's office.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Postgraduate 3 15%
Student > Master 3 15%
Other 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Other 4 20%
Unknown 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 65%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Neuroscience 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2015.
All research outputs
#3,082,046
of 6,507,444 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#51
of 170 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,079
of 206,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#7
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,507,444 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 170 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 206,994 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.