↓ Skip to main content

Excessive intraoperative blood loss independently predicts recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Gastroenterology, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Excessive intraoperative blood loss independently predicts recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation
Published in
BMC Gastroenterology, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12876-015-0364-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bing Liu, Fei Teng, Hong Fu, Wen-Yuan Guo, Xiao-Min Shi, Zhi-Jia Ni, Xiao-Gang Gao, Jun Ma, Zhi-Ren Fu, Guo-Shan Ding

Abstract

Several studies have investigated the effect of intraoperative blood loss (IBL) on recurrence of tumors. However, the independent effect of IBL on oncological outcome after liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. A total of 479 patients who underwent LT for HCC from January 2001 to December 2012 at our institution were enrolled in this retrospective study. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods were used to assess the recurrence rate, as well as its risk factors. Stratified analysis was performed to further examine the effect of IBL on HCC recurrence according to different characteristics of tumors. We also investigated the independent risk factors for excessive IBL using logistic regression analysis. The median follow-up was 28 months (range, 1-131 months). Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test according to IBL at per liter intervals showed that IBL > 4 L was significantly associated with a higher recurrence rate (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis identified that IBL > 4 L (P < 0.001; hazard ratio [HR] = 2.32, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.60-3.36) was an independent risk factor for post-LT HCC recurrence, as well as age < 60 years, exceeding Milan criteria, α-fetoprotein levels > 400 ng/mL, and micro- and macrovascular invasion. IBL > 4 L (P < 0.001; HR = 2.45, 95 % CI = 1.64-3.66) was also independently associated with early (within 1 year) recurrence after LT. Furthermore, a significant correlation between IBL > 4 L and vascular invasion (P = 0.019) was found. IBL > 4 L was independently associated with HCC recurrence for patients with vascular invasion, but not for patients without vascular invasion. Finally, we found that the presence of ascites, model for end-stage liver disease score, and operation time were independent risk factors for IBL > 4 L. Excessive IBL is an independent predictor of HCC recurrence after LT, especially in patients with vascular invasion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 20%
Researcher 2 13%
Lecturer 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Professor 1 7%
Other 4 27%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 53%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Mathematics 1 7%
Unknown 4 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2016.
All research outputs
#4,266,854
of 8,071,125 outputs
Outputs from BMC Gastroenterology
#333
of 694 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,218
of 243,651 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Gastroenterology
#21
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,071,125 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 694 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,651 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.