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Load-distributing-band cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest increases regional cerebral oxygenation: a single-center prospective pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, November 2015
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3 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Load-distributing-band cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest increases regional cerebral oxygenation: a single-center prospective pilot study
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13049-015-0182-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoshihito Ogawa, Tadahiko Shiozaki, Tomoya Hirose, Mitsuo Ohnishi, Yasushi Nakamori, Hiroshi Ogura, Takeshi Shimazu

Abstract

Despite advances in therapeutic strategies and improved guidelines, morbidity and mortality rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remain high. Especially, neurological prognosis is one of the most important problems even though brain protection therapy for patients with OHCA has improved greatly in recent years due to the development of emergency post-cardiac arrest interventions such as mild therapeutic hypothermia, early percutaneous coronary intervention, and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Recently, cerebral regional oxygen saturation (rSO2) has received attention as a method for evaluation of cerebral oxygenation. We have reported that conventional chest compression did not improve the rSO2 of cardiac arrest patients if they did not achieve return of spontaneous circulation. It is, however, unclear whether a mechanical CPR device is helpful in improving rSO2. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of load-distributing-band CPR (LDB-CPR) on rSO2. In this prospective study, LDB-CPR was begun for OHCA with the AutoPulse(TM) device on patient arrival at hospital. During mechanical CPR, rSO2 values were recorded continuously from the forehead of the patients. CPR for patients with OHCA was performed according to the Japan Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2010 except for using the AutoPulse(TM) instead of manual chest compression. From December 2012 to December 2013, 34 patients (mean age, 75.6 ± 12.8 years) with OHCA were included in this study. Duration of time from recognition of cardiac collapse to arrival to hospital was 31.0 ± 11.4 min. Compared with the rSO2 value of 38.9 ± 0.7 % prior to starting LDB-CPR, rSO2 values at 4, 8 and 12 minutes increased significantly after initiation of LDB-CPR (44.0 ± 0.9 %, 45.2 ± 0.8 %, and 45.5 ± 0.8 %, respectively, p < 0.05). LDB-CPR significantly increased the rSO2 of cardiac arrest patients during resuscitation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 61 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 19%
Student > Postgraduate 7 11%
Student > Master 7 11%
Other 6 10%
Researcher 6 10%
Other 14 22%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 49%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 17%
Engineering 2 3%
Psychology 2 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 14 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2016.
All research outputs
#8,977,681
of 15,640,884 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#633
of 960 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,720
of 284,869 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#50
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,640,884 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 960 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,869 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.