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Fecal microbiota and bile acid interactions with systemic and adipose tissue metabolism in diet-induced weight loss of obese postmenopausal women

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, September 2018
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3 tweeters

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Title
Fecal microbiota and bile acid interactions with systemic and adipose tissue metabolism in diet-induced weight loss of obese postmenopausal women
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12967-018-1619-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

José O. Alemán, Nicholas A. Bokulich, Jonathan R. Swann, Jeanne M. Walker, Joel Correa De Rosa, Thomas Battaglia, Adele Costabile, Alexandros Pechlivanis, Yupu Liang, Jan L. Breslow, Martin J. Blaser, Peter R. Holt

Abstract

Microbiota and bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract profoundly alter systemic metabolic processes. In obese subjects, gradual weight loss ameliorates adipose tissue inflammation and related systemic changes. We assessed how rapid weight loss due to a very low calorie diet (VLCD) affects the fecal microbiome and fecal bile acid composition, and their interactions with the plasma metabolome and subcutaneous adipose tissue inflammation in obesity. We performed a prospective cohort study of VLCD-induced weight loss of 10% in ten grades 2-3 obese postmenopausal women in a metabolic unit. Baseline and post weight loss evaluation included fasting plasma analyzed by mass spectrometry, adipose tissue transcription by RNA sequencing, stool 16S rRNA sequencing for fecal microbiota, fecal bile acids by mass spectrometry, and urinary metabolic phenotyping by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Outcome measures included mixed model correlations between changes in fecal microbiota and bile acid composition with changes in plasma metabolite and adipose tissue gene expression pathways. Alterations in the urinary metabolic phenotype following VLCD-induced weight loss were consistent with starvation ketosis, protein sparing, and disruptions to the functional status of the gut microbiota. We show that the core microbiome was preserved during VLCD-induced weight loss, but with changes in several groups of bacterial taxa with functional implications. UniFrac analysis showed overall parallel shifts in community structure, corresponding to reduced abundance of the genus Roseburia and increased Christensenellaceae;g__ (unknown genus). Imputed microbial functions showed changes in fat and carbohydrate metabolism. A significant fall in fecal total bile acid concentration and reduced deconjugation and 7-α-dihydroxylation were accompanied by significant changes in several bacterial taxa. Individual bile acids in feces correlated with amino acid, purine, and lipid metabolic pathways in plasma. Furthermore, several fecal bile acids and bacterial species correlated with altered gene expression pathways in adipose tissue. VLCD dietary intervention in obese women changed the composition of several fecal microbial populations while preserving the core fecal microbiome. Changes in individual microbial taxa and their functions correlated with variations in the plasma metabolome, fecal bile acid composition, and adipose tissue transcriptome. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01699906, 4-Oct-2012, Retrospectively registered. URL- https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01699906.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 135 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 19%
Student > Master 16 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 10%
Student > Bachelor 8 6%
Other 6 4%
Other 21 16%
Unknown 46 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 2%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 52 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2018.
All research outputs
#12,736,755
of 16,687,092 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#2,352
of 3,128 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,955
of 279,153 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 3,128 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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