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The hidden burden of adult allergic rhinitis: UK healthcare resource utilisation survey

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Allergy, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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67 Dimensions

Readers on

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68 Mendeley
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Title
The hidden burden of adult allergic rhinitis: UK healthcare resource utilisation survey
Published in
Clinical and Translational Allergy, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13601-015-0083-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Price, Glenis Scadding, Dermot Ryan, Claus Bachert, G. Walter Canonica, Joaquim Mullol, Ludger Klimek, Richard Pitman, Sarah Acaster, Ruth Murray, Jean Bousquet

Abstract

The affliction of allergic rhinitis (AR) has been trivialised in the past. Recent initiatives by the European Academy of Allergy & Clinical Immunology and by the EU parliament seek to rectify that situation. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive picture of the burden and unmet need of AR patients. This was a cross-sectional, online, questionnaire-based study (June-July 2011) including symptomatic seasonal AR (SAR) patients (≥18 years) from a panel. SAR episode pattern, severity, medication/co-medication usage, residual symptoms on treatment, number of healthcare visits, absenteeism and presenteeism were collected. One thousand patients were recruited (mild: n = 254; moderate/severe: n = 746). Patients with moderate/severe disease had significantly more symptomatic episodes/year (8.0 vs 6.0/year; p = 0.025) with longer episode-duration (12.5 vs 9.8 days; p = 0.0041) and more commonly used ≥2 AR therapies (70.5 vs 56.1 %; OR 1.87; p = 0.0001), looking for better and faster nasal and ocular symptom relief. The reported symptom burden was high irrespective of treatment, and significantly (p < 0.0001) higher in the moderate/severe group. Patients with moderate/severe AR were more likely to visit their GP (1.61 vs 1.19 times/year; OR: 1.49; p = 0.0061); due to dissatisfaction with therapy in 35.4 % of cases. Patients reported SAR-related absenteeism from work on 4.1 days/year (total cost to UK: £1.25 billion/year) and noted presenteeism for a mean of 37.7 days/year (vs 21.0 days/year; OR 1.71; p = 0.0048). Asthma co-morbid patients reported the need to increase their reliever- (1 in 2 patients) and controller-medication (1 in 5 patients) if they did not take their rhinitis medication. This study differentiated between patients with mild and moderate/severe AR, demonstrating a burden of poorly controlled symptoms and high co-medication use. The deficiency in obtaining symptom control with what are currently considered firstline treatments suggests the need for a novel therapeutic approach.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 68 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 15%
Student > Master 10 15%
Researcher 10 15%
Other 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 40%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Other 15 22%
Unknown 15 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2018.
All research outputs
#5,048,877
of 18,777,296 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#273
of 544 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,370
of 382,456 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#6
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,777,296 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 544 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 382,456 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.