↓ Skip to main content

Length and density of filiform tongue papillae: differences between tick-susceptible and resistant cattle may affect tick loads

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Length and density of filiform tongue papillae: differences between tick-susceptible and resistant cattle may affect tick loads
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1196-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cecília José Veríssimo, Selma Marques D’Agostino, Fernanda Ferreira Pessoa, Luciandra Macedo de Toledo, Isabel Kinney Ferreira de Miranda Santos

Abstract

Indicine breeds of bovines are highly resistant and taurine breeds are susceptible to the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, a species which causes great damage to livestock. Animals use their tongues for self-grooming, an important behavior for ridding themselves of ectoparasites. However, the role of tongue morphology, notably the filiform papillae, in this process is not known. This study compared features of the filiform papillae of tongues in eight Nelores (indicine breed) and eight Holsteins and two Brown Swiss (taurine breeds) and verified how they associate with tick loads. Biopsies were taken from identical positions of tongues and measured by scanning electron microscopy. One-way analysis of variance detected significant differences between morphological features of tongues from indicine and taurine breeds: Nelores had longer papillae (mean of 2.3 mm ± 0.029 SD; P < 0.001), and more papillae per cm(2) (mean of 25.2 papillae ± 1.92 SD; P < 0.05) than European bovines (means of, respectively, 1.8 mm ± 0.027 SD and 20.9 ± 0.74 SD papillae per cm(2)). After infestations with equal numbers of larvae, loads of adult ticks were inversely correlated with length of papillae and directly correlated with distances between the apices of papillae (P = 0.014; r = -0.566 and P = 0.018; r = 0.567, Pearson product momentum correlation, respectively). Spacing between papillae is smaller in Nelores, thus their tongues may be rougher and, consequently, more effective in removing tick larvae during self-grooming, explaining the greater resistance to ticks among Zebu breeds of cattle.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 22%
Researcher 3 17%
Student > Master 3 17%
Other 1 6%
Professor 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Unknown 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 11%
Physics and Astronomy 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,181,943
of 8,133,552 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,625
of 2,254 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,989
of 294,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#128
of 177 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,133,552 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,254 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,144 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 177 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.