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Risks of miscarriage and inadvertent exposure to artemisinin derivatives in the first trimester of pregnancy: a prospective cohort study in western Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
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Title
Risks of miscarriage and inadvertent exposure to artemisinin derivatives in the first trimester of pregnancy: a prospective cohort study in western Kenya
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0950-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie Dellicour, Meghna Desai, George Aol, Martina Oneko, Peter Ouma, Godfrey Bigogo, Deron C. Burton, Robert F. Breiman, Mary J. Hamel, Laurence Slutsker, Daniel Feikin, Simon Kariuki, Frank Odhiambo, Jayesh Pandit, Kayla F. Laserson, Greg Calip, Andy Stergachis, Feiko O. ter Kuile

Abstract

The artemisinin anti-malarials are widely deployed as artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). However, they are not recommended for uncomplicated malaria during the first trimester because safety data from humans are scarce. This was a prospective cohort study of women of child-bearing age carried out in 2011-2013, evaluating the relationship between inadvertent ACT exposure during first trimester and miscarriage. Community-based surveillance was used to identify 1134 early pregnancies. Cox proportional hazard models with left truncation were used. The risk of miscarriage among pregnancies exposed to ACT (confirmed + unconfirmed) in the first trimester, or during the embryo-sensitive period (≥6 to <13 weeks gestation) was higher than among pregnancies unexposed to anti-malarials in the first trimester: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.70, 95 % CI (1.08-2.68) and HR = 1.61 (0.96-2.70). For confirmed ACT-exposures (primary analysis) the corresponding values were: HR = 1.24 (0.56-2.74) and HR = 0.73 (0.19-2.82) relative to unexposed women, and HR = 0.99 (0.12-8.33) and HR = 0.32 (0.03-3.61) relative to quinine exposure, but the numbers of quinine exposures were very small. ACT exposure in early pregnancy was more common than quinine exposure. Confirmed inadvertent artemisinin exposure during the potential embryo-sensitive period was not associated with increased risk of miscarriage. Confirmatory studies are needed to rule out a smaller than three-fold increase in risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 82 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 23%
Student > Master 10 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 7%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 36%
Social Sciences 13 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 5%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 16 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 October 2016.
All research outputs
#1,411,120
of 8,580,868 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#482
of 3,015 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,111
of 300,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#20
of 164 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,580,868 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,015 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,072 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 164 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.