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Remodeling of nuclear landscapes during human myelopoietic cell differentiation maintains co-aligned active and inactive nuclear compartments

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, November 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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29 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Remodeling of nuclear landscapes during human myelopoietic cell differentiation maintains co-aligned active and inactive nuclear compartments
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13072-015-0038-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Barbara Hübner, Mariana Lomiento, Fabiana Mammoli, Doris Illner, Yolanda Markaki, Sergio Ferrari, Marion Cremer, Thomas Cremer

Abstract

Previous studies of higher order chromatin organization in nuclei of mammalian species revealed both structural consistency and species-specific differences between cell lines and during early embryonic development. Here, we extended our studies to nuclear landscapes in the human myelopoietic lineage representing a somatic cell differentiation system. Our longterm goal is a search for structural features of nuclei, which are restricted to certain cell types/species, as compared to features, which are evolutionary highly conserved, arguing for their basic functional roles in nuclear organization. Common human hematopoietic progenitors, myeloid precursor cells, differentiated monocytes and granulocytes analyzed by super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy revealed profound differences with respect to global chromatin arrangements, the nuclear space occupied by the interchromatin compartment and the distribution of nuclear pores. In contrast, we noted a consistent organization in all cell types with regard to two co-aligned networks, an active (ANC) and an inactive (INC) nuclear compartment delineated by functionally relevant hallmarks. The ANC is enriched in active RNA polymerase II, splicing speckles and histone signatures for transcriptionally competent chromatin (H3K4me3), whereas the INC carries marks for repressed chromatin (H3K9me3). Our findings substantiate the conservation of the recently published ANC-INC network model of mammalian nuclear organization during human myelopoiesis irrespective of profound changes of the global nuclear architecture observed during this differentiation process. According to this model, two spatially co-aligned and functionally interacting active and inactive nuclear compartments (ANC and INC) pervade the nuclear space.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
Germany 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 58 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 21%
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Professor 4 6%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Engineering 3 5%
Physics and Astronomy 3 5%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 9 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2020.
All research outputs
#1,683,293
of 19,764,860 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#57
of 524 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,410
of 390,748 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#15
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,764,860 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 524 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 390,748 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.