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Peripheral blood natural killer cell percentages in granulomatosis with polyangiitis correlate with disease inactivity and stage

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, November 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Peripheral blood natural killer cell percentages in granulomatosis with polyangiitis correlate with disease inactivity and stage
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0851-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wolfgang Merkt, Prisca Sturm, Felix Lasitschka, Theresa Tretter, Carsten Watzl, Daniel Saure, Michael Hundemer, Vedat Schwenger, Norbert Blank, Hanns-Martin Lorenz, Adelheid Cerwenka

Abstract

The role of CD3-CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is poorly understood. Recently, it has been shown that peripheral blood NK cells can kill renal microvascular endothelial cells, suggesting a pathogenic role of NK cells in this disease. So far, subset distribution, phenotype, and function of peripheral blood NK cells in relation to GPA disease activity have not been elucidated. Moreover, it is not known whether NK cells infiltrate GPA tissue lesions. Paraffin sections of GPA granulomas and controls were stained with anti-CD56 and anti-CD3 antibodies. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. NK cell degranulation was analyzed using cocultures of patient PBMCs with target cells and surface expression of CD107a. Clinical data were extracted from medical records. Statistical analysis was performed in an exploratory way. CD56+ cells were not detectable in active granulomatous GPA lesions but were found frequently in granulomas from tuberculosis and sarcoidosis patients. In GPA, the proportion of NK cells among peripheral blood lymphocytes correlated negatively with the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS) (n = 28). Accordingly, NK cell percentages correlated positively with the duration of remission (n = 28) and were significantly higher in inactive GPA (BVAS = 0, n = 17) than in active GPA, healthy controls (n = 29), and inactive control diseases (n = 12). The highest NK cell percentages were found in patients with long-term remission and tapered immunosuppressive therapy. NK cell percentages >18.5 % of peripheral blood lymphocytes (n = 12/28) determined GPA inactivity with a specificity of 100 %. The differentiation into CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cell subsets was unchanged in GPA (n = 28), irrespective of disease activity. Similar surface expression of the activating NK cell-receptors (NKp30, NKp46, and NKG2D) was determined. Like in healthy controls, GPA NK cells degranulated in the presence of NK cell receptor ligand bearing epithelial and lymphatic target cells. NK cells were not detectable in GPA granulomas. Peripheral blood NK cell percentages positively correlate with the suppression of GPA activity and could serve as a biomarker for GPA activity. Peripheral blood NK cells in GPA patients are mature NK cells with preserved immune recognition.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 3%
Unknown 39 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 20%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 10%
Chemical Engineering 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 11 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2016.
All research outputs
#1,279,563
of 12,451,992 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#312
of 1,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,948
of 336,989 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#63
of 288 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,451,992 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,983 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 336,989 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 288 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.