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Health literacy and refugees’ experiences of the health examination for asylum seekers – a Swedish cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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1 policy source
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Citations

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77 Dimensions

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160 Mendeley
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Title
Health literacy and refugees’ experiences of the health examination for asylum seekers – a Swedish cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2513-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Josefin Wångdahl, Per Lytsy, Lena Mårtensson, Ragnar Westerling

Abstract

The purpose of the health examination for asylum seekers in most countries is to identify poor health in order to secure the well-being of seekers of asylum and to guarantee the safety of the population in the host country. Functional health literacy is an individual's ability to read information and instructions about health and to function effectively as a patient in the health system, and comprehensive health literacy is an individual's competence in accessing, understanding, appraising and applying health information. Little is known about refugees' health literacy and their experiences of the health examination for asylum seekers. The purposes of the study were to investigate refugees' experiences of communication during their health examination for asylum seekers and the usefulness of that examination, and whether health literacy is associated with those experiences. A cross-sectional study was made among 360 adult refugees speaking Arabic, Dari, Somali or English. Health literacy was measured using the Swedish Functional Health Literacy Scale and the short European Health Literacy Questionnaire. Experiences of communication and the usefulness of the health examination were measured in several questions. Associations were sought using univariate and multivariate statistical models. In the health examination for asylum seekers, a poor quality of communication was experienced by 36 %, receiving little information about health care by 55 %, and receiving little new knowledge by 41 % and/or help by 26 %. Having inadequate as compared to sufficient comprehensive health literacy was associated with the experience of a poorer quality of communication (OR: 9.64, CI 95 %: 3.25-28.58) and the experience of receiving little valuable health care information (OR: 6.54, CI 95 %: 2.45-17.47). Furthermore, having inadequate as compared to sufficient comprehensive health literacy was associated with the experience of not receiving new knowledge (OR: 7.94, CI 95 %: 3.00-21.06) or receiving help with health problems (OR: 8.07, 95 % CI: 2.50-26.07. Functional healthy literacy was not associated with experiences of HEA. Refugees' experiences indicate that a low level of comprehensive health literacy can act as a barrier to fulfilling the purposes of the health examination for asylum seekers. Comprehensive health literacy seems to be of greater importance in that context than functional health literacy.

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X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 160 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 159 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 18%
Student > Bachelor 20 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 11%
Researcher 16 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 8%
Other 28 18%
Unknown 38 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 14%
Social Sciences 19 12%
Psychology 14 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 3%
Other 15 9%
Unknown 47 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2022.
All research outputs
#6,330,932
of 25,299,129 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,499
of 16,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,958
of 399,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#88
of 230 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,299,129 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,946 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 399,202 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 230 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.