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Chronic dexamethasone exposure retards growth without altering the digestive tract microbiota composition in goats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, September 2018
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Title
Chronic dexamethasone exposure retards growth without altering the digestive tract microbiota composition in goats
Published in
BMC Microbiology, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12866-018-1253-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Canfeng Hua, Yali Geng, Qu Chen, Liqiong Niu, Liuping Cai, Shiyu Tao, Yingdong Ni, Ruqian Zhao

Abstract

Dexamethasone (Dex), an artificially synthetic cortisol substitute, is commonly used as an anti-inflammatory drug, and is also employed to mimic the stress state experimentally. It is well known that chronic stress disturbs the gut microbiota community and digestive functions. However, no relevant studies have been conducted in ruminants. In this study, a low dosage of Dex (0.2 mg/kg body weight, Dex group, n = 5) was consecutively injected intramuscularly for 21 days to simulate chronic stress in growing goats. Goats were injected with saline (0.2 mg/kg body weight) as the control group (Con, n = 5). Dex-treated goats showed a higher number of white blood cells and blood glucose levels (p < 0.01), but lower dry matter intake (DMI) and body weight (p < 0.01) than those of saline-injected goats. Plasma cortisol concentration decreased significantly in response to the Dex injection compared to the control (p < 0.05). The Dex treatment did not change most ruminal volatile fatty acid (VFAs) concentrations before the morning feeding after 1-21 days of treatment (p > 0.05); however, ruminal VFA concentrations decreased dramatically 2, 4, 6, and 8 h after the morning feeding on day 21 of the Dex injections. In this study, chronic Dex exposure did not alter the community structure of microbes or methanogenes in the rumen, caecum, or colonic digesta. Only Prevotella increased on days 7 and 14 of Dex treatment, but decreased on day 21, and Methanosphaera was the only genus of methanogene that decreased. Our results suggest that chronic Dex exposure retards growth by decreasing DMI, which may be mediated by higher levels of blood glucose and lower ruminal VFA production. Microbiota in the digestive tract was highly resistant to chronic Dex exposure.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 8 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 9%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 8 35%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2018.
All research outputs
#18,294,766
of 23,498,099 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#2,048
of 3,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#243,576
of 338,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#40
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,498,099 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,256 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,313 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.