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Trauma and perceived social rejection among Yazidi women and girls who survived enslavement and genocide

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
45 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
170 Mendeley
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Title
Trauma and perceived social rejection among Yazidi women and girls who survived enslavement and genocide
Published in
BMC Medicine, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12916-018-1140-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hawkar Ibrahim, Verena Ertl, Claudia Catani, Azad Ali Ismail, Frank Neuner

Abstract

In August 2014, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), a terrorist organization, attacked the Yazidi's ancestral homeland in northwestern Iraq. Among other atrocities, they abducted thousands of women and girls and traded many of them into sexual slavery. The aim of this study is to determine the mental health of women and girl survivors of these events in relation to enslavement and experiences with genocide-related events, as well as perceived social rejection in their community. Between February and July 2017, trained local assessors interviewed a sample of 416 Yazidi women and girls (65 of whom had survived sexual enslavement), aged between 17 and 75 years, and living in internally displaced person camps in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms were assessed using validated Kurdish versions of standard instruments. Scales for trauma exposure and perceived rejection were developed for the purpose of this study. Participants reported a high number of traumatic events. More than 80% of girls and women, and almost all participants who were formerly enslaved, met criteria for a probable DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis. Trauma exposure and enslavement predicted poor mental health. In addition, among formerly enslaved girls and women, perceived social rejection in their community mediated the relationship between traumatic enslavement events and depression symptoms. In a context of maximum adversity, enslavement and war-related events contribute to high levels of PTSD and depression. Perceived social rejection seems to play a role in the relationship between trauma exposure and mental health among abducted genocide survivors. Providing psychosocial support and treatment for Yazidi people is essential and urgently required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 170 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 170 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 27 16%
Student > Master 23 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 12%
Student > Bachelor 16 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 8%
Other 32 19%
Unknown 38 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 39 23%
Unspecified 29 17%
Social Sciences 21 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 8%
Arts and Humanities 6 4%
Other 20 12%
Unknown 41 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 93. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2022.
All research outputs
#388,790
of 23,070,218 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#304
of 3,463 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,317
of 337,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#9
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,070,218 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,463 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 43.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 337,796 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.