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Pregnancy and estrogen enhance neural progenitor-cell proliferation in the vomeronasal sensory epithelium

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Pregnancy and estrogen enhance neural progenitor-cell proliferation in the vomeronasal sensory epithelium
Published in
BMC Biology, November 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12915-015-0211-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Livio Oboti, Ximena Ibarra-Soria, Anabel Pérez-Gómez, Andreas Schmid, Martina Pyrski, Nicole Paschek, Sarah Kircher, Darren W. Logan, Trese Leinders-Zufall, Frank Zufall, Pablo Chamero

Abstract

The hormonal state during the estrus cycle or pregnancy produces alterations on female olfactory perception that are accompanied by specific maternal behaviors, but it is unclear how sex hormones act on the olfactory system to enable these sensory changes. Herein, we show that the production of neuronal progenitors is stimulated in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) epithelium of female mice during a late phase of pregnancy. Using a wide range of molecular markers that cover the whole VNO cell maturation process in combination with Ca(2+) imaging in early postmitotic neurons, we show that newly generated VNO cells adopt morphological and functional properties of mature sensory neurons. A fraction of these newly generated cells project their axons to the olfactory forebrain, extend dendrites that contact the VNO lumen, and can detect peptides and urinary proteins shown to contain pheromone activity. High-throughput RNA-sequencing reveals concomitant differences in gene expression in the VNO transcriptomes of pregnant females. These include relative increases in expression of 20 vomeronasal receptors, of which 17 belong to the V1R subfamily, and may therefore be considered as candidate receptors for mediating maternal behaviors. We identify the expression of several hormone receptors in the VNO of which estrogen receptor α (Esr1) is directly localized to neural progenitors. Administration of sustained high levels of estrogen, but not progesterone, is sufficient to stimulate vomeronasal progenitor cell proliferation in the VNO epithelium. Peripheral olfactory neurogenesis driven by estrogen may contribute to modulate sensory perception and adaptive VNO-dependent behaviors during pregnancy and early motherhood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 22%
Student > Master 6 11%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 44%
Neuroscience 10 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 15%
Psychology 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2019.
All research outputs
#4,013,976
of 14,854,534 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#807
of 1,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,554
of 360,398 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#59
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,854,534 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,273 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.0. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 360,398 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.