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A voyage to Terra Australis: human-mediated dispersal of cats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
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Title
A voyage to Terra Australis: human-mediated dispersal of cats
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0542-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. Koch, D. Algar, J. B. Searle, M. Pfenninger, K. Schwenk

Abstract

Cats have been transported as human commensals worldwide giving rise to many feral populations. In Australia, feral cats have caused decline and extinction of native mammals, but their time of introduction and origin is unclear. Here, we investigate hypotheses of cat arrival pre- or post-European settlement, and the potential for admixture between cats of different invasion events. We analyse the genetic structure and diversity of feral cats from six locations on mainland Australia, seven Australian islands and samples from Southeast Asia and Europe using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA data. Our results based on phylogeographic model selection are consistent with a European origin of cats in Australia. We find genetic distinctiveness of Australian mainland samples compared with Dirk Hartog Island, Flinders Island, Tasman Island and Cocos (Keeling) Island samples, and genetic similarities between some of the island populations. Historical records suggest that introduction of cats to these islands occurred at the time of European exploration and/or in connection with the pearling, whaling and sealing trades early in the 19th century. On-going influx of domestic cats into the feral cat population is apparently causing the Australian mainland populations to be genetically differentiated from those island populations, which likely are remnants of the historically introduced cat genotypes. A mainly European origin of feral cats in Australia, with possible secondary introductions from Asia following the initial establishment of cats in Australia is reasonable. The islands surrounding Australia may represent founding populations and are of particular interest. The results of the study provide an important timeframe for the impact of feral cats on native species in Australia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 5%
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 40 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 28%
Researcher 9 21%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 42%
Environmental Science 8 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 9%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 8 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2016.
All research outputs
#503,700
of 15,921,004 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#107
of 2,731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,192
of 368,117 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#16
of 231 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,921,004 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,731 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 368,117 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 231 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.