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Back pain was less explained than leg pain: a cross-sectional study using magnetic resonance imaging in low back pain patients with and without radiculopathy

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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3 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Back pain was less explained than leg pain: a cross-sectional study using magnetic resonance imaging in low back pain patients with and without radiculopathy
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12891-015-0827-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ole Kudsk Jensen, Claus Vinther Nielsen, Joan Solgaard Sørensen, Kristian Stengaard-Pedersen

Abstract

Cross-sectional studies have shown associations between lumbar degenerative manifestations on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and low back pain (LBP). Disc herniations and other degenerative manifestations, however, frequently occur in asymptomatic individuals. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to analyze for associations between pain intensity and degenerative manifestations and other pain variables in patients for whom prognostic factors have been published previously. Included were 141 consecutive patients with and without radiculopathy, all sick-listed 1-4 months due to low back pain and subsequently examined by MRI of the lumbar spine. Using different methods of grouping the degenerative manifestations, linear regression analyses were performed with the intensity of back + leg pain, back pain and leg pain as dependent variables covering actual pain and pain the preceding 2 weeks. The clinical classification into +/- radiculopathy was established before and independently of the standardised description of MRI findings. Radiculopathy was present in 43 % of the patients. Pain was best explained using rank-ordered degenerative manifestations on MRI. Back pain and leg pain were differently associated, and back pain was less explained than leg pain in the multivariate analyses (15 % vs. 31 % of the variation). Back pain intensity was higher in patients with type 1 Modic changes and in some patients with nerve root touch, but was not associated with disc herniations. Leg pain intensity was well explained by disc herniations causing MRI nerve root compromise and radiculopathy. In patients with radiculopathy, nerve root touch caused as much leg pain as nerve root displacement or compression. High intensity zones and osteophytes were not associated with back pain, but only associated with leg pain in patients with radiculopathy. Tender points explained some of the back pain, and widespread pain explained leg pain in some of the patients without radiculopathy. Back pain was associated with type 1 Modic changes, nerve root touch and tender points, whereas leg pain was associated with osteophytes, HIZ, disc herniation, all sorts of MRI nerve root compromise, radiculopathy and widespread pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 67 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 20%
Other 11 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 10 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 22%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Sports and Recreations 2 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 12 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,192,585
of 12,254,406 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#920
of 2,428 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,125
of 321,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#34
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,254,406 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,428 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 321,970 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.