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A C. elegans model of electronic cigarette use: Physiological effects of e-liquids in nematodes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#34 of 351)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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25 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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76 Mendeley
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Title
A C. elegans model of electronic cigarette use: Physiological effects of e-liquids in nematodes
Published in
BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40360-015-0030-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Panitz, Harsha Swamy, Keith Nehrke

Abstract

Electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) have recently become very popular particularly among the younger generation. These nicotine delivery devices are viewed as a preferable alternative to more conventional forms of tobacco use and are thought to reduce the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the third leading cause of death worldwide. However, there is very little data available on the consequences of e-cig use, though recently nicotine-independent inflammatory responses have been reported. The genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans is a soil nematode whose cell biology is remarkably well conserved with mammals. Here, we used C. elegans to test the physiologic effects of e-liquids used to refill e-cigs. Larval worms were exposed from hatching onwards to low concentrations (0.2 %) of e-liquids, distilled e-liquid vapor, propylene glycol (PG), or M9 buffer as a negative control. E-liquids tested included grape, menthol, and V2 Red "classic tobacco" flavors. Nicotine (48 ppm) was tested as a second level variable. Stereotypical physiological outputs were then measured, including developmental rate, fecundity, locomotion, lifespan, and the induction of canonical stress signaling pathways. A small but significant impairment of developmental rate and brood size was observed for PG and V2 Red treated worms compared to the negative control. Worms treated with e-liquids containing nicotine fared significantly worse than those that did not, but vaporization did not increase toxicity. Finally, both PG and V2 Red e-liquid induced an oxidative stress response in the absence of nicotine. PG exposure is sufficient to induce an oxidative stress response in nematodes, while nicotine is not. Both PG and nicotine independently influence physiologic measures of health and viability. The e-liquid flavorings did not significantly impact outcomes and there was no evidence for vaporization altering toxicity. These data suggest that the major physiologically significant component of e-liquids besides nicotine is likely the common solvent PG. We conclude that C. elegans are an appropriate model to rapidly assess parameters that may contribute to the basic cell biological effects of e-cigs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 76 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 17 22%
Student > Master 13 17%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Other 7 9%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 7 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 14%
Environmental Science 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 9%
Psychology 5 7%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 8 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2018.
All research outputs
#1,874,530
of 17,381,824 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#34
of 351 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,372
of 373,532 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#6
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,381,824 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 351 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,532 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.