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Extension of mandatory health insurance to informal sector workers in Togo

Overview of attention for article published in Health Economics Review, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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58 Mendeley
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Title
Extension of mandatory health insurance to informal sector workers in Togo
Published in
Health Economics Review, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13561-018-0208-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dosse Mawussi Djahini-Afawoubo, Esso-Hanam Atake

Abstract

About 90.4% of Togolese workers operate in the informal sector and account for between 20 and 30% of Togo's Gross Domestic Product. Despite their importance in the Togolese economy, informal sector workers (ISW) do not have a health insurance scheme. This paper aims to estimate the willingness-to-pay (WTP) of ISW in order to have access to Mandatory Health Insurance (MHI), and to analyze the main determinants of WTP. This study used data from the Community-Based Monitoring System (CBMS) project implemented in 2015 by the Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP). It focusses on 4,296 ISW (2,374 in urban areas and 1,922 in rural areas, respectively). The contingent valuation method was used to determine the WTP for the MHI while the Tobit model is used to analyze its determinants. Findings indicate that about 92% of ISW agreed to have access to MHI, like for formal sector workers. Overall, ISW are willing to pay 2,569 FCFA (USD 4.7) per month. ISW in the poorest quintiles are willing to allocate a higher proportion of their income (15%) to the premium than the richest quintiles (2.5%). Generally, women are more interested in MHI than men, although men are willing to pay higher premiums (3,168.9 FCFA or USD 5.8) than women (2,077 FCFA or USD 3.8). Women's lower WTP can be explained by their low levels of education and income, and a lack of employment opportunities compared to men. The gender of the head of the household, the size of the household and the education and income levels are the main determinants of WTP. We conclude that it is possible to extend MHI to ISW as long as their premiums are subsidized. The annual subsidy is estimated at 4.1% of the state current general budget or 96% of the health sector budget. In setting the premium, policy makers should take into account the MHI benefits package, subsidies from the government, and information about the WTP. It is important to emphasize that resource mobilization and management, as well as health services delivery, would be effective only in a context of improved governance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 19 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 14 24%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 8 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 18 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2018.
All research outputs
#8,491,225
of 15,442,255 outputs
Outputs from Health Economics Review
#110
of 294 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,775
of 276,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Economics Review
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,442,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 294 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,430 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them