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Activation of the SOS response increases the frequency of small colony variants

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, December 2015
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Title
Activation of the SOS response increases the frequency of small colony variants
Published in
BMC Research Notes, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1735-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin Vestergaard, Wilhelm Paulander, Hanne Ingmer

Abstract

In Staphylococcus aureus sub-populations of slow-growing cells forming small colony variants (SCVs) are associated with persistent and recurrent infections that are difficult to eradicate with antibiotic therapies. In SCVs that are resistant towards aminoglycosides, mutations have been identified in genes encoding components of the respiratory chain. Given the high frequencies of SCVs isolated clinically it is vital to understand the conditions that promote or select for SCVs. In this study we have examined how exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics with different mechanism of action influence the formation of SCVs that are resistant to otherwise lethal concentrations of the aminoglycoside, gentamicin. We found that exposure of S. aureus to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C increased the frequency of gentamicin resistant SCVs, while other antibiotic classes failed to do so. The higher proportion of SCVs in cultures exposed to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C compared to un-exposed cultures correlate with an increased mutation rate monitored by rifampicin resistance and followed induction of the SOS DNA damage response. Our observations suggest that environmental stimuli, including antimicrobials that reduce replication fidelity, increase the formation of SCVs through activation of the SOS response and thereby potentially promote persistent infections that are difficult to treat.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Hungary 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Belgium 1 2%
Unknown 43 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 24%
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Student > Master 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Librarian 2 4%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 11 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Engineering 3 7%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2015.
All research outputs
#5,738,967
of 6,717,285 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,456
of 1,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#228,009
of 282,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#120
of 157 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,717,285 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,807 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,435 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 157 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.