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Saprophytic and pathogenic fungi in the Ceratocystidaceae differ in their ability to metabolize plant-derived sucrose

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
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4 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Saprophytic and pathogenic fungi in the Ceratocystidaceae differ in their ability to metabolize plant-derived sucrose
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0550-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. A. Van der Nest, E. T. Steenkamp, A. R. McTaggart, C. Trollip, T. Godlonton, E. Sauerman, D. Roodt, K. Naidoo, M. P. A. Coetzee, P. M. Wilken, M. J. Wingfield, B. D. Wingfield

Abstract

Proteins in the Glycoside Hydrolase family 32 (GH32) are carbohydrate-active enzymes known as invertases that hydrolyse the glycosidic bonds of complex saccharides. Fungi rely on these enzymes to gain access to and utilize plant-derived sucrose. In fungi, GH32 invertase genes are found in higher copy numbers in the genomes of pathogens when compared to closely related saprophytes, suggesting an association between invertases and ecological strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution and evolution of GH32 invertases in the Ceratocystidaceae using a comparative genomics approach. This fungal family provides an interesting model to study the evolution of these genes, because it includes economically important pathogenic species such as Ceratocystis fimbriata, C. manginecans and C. albifundus, as well as saprophytic species such as Huntiella moniliformis, H. omanensis and H. savannae. The publicly available Ceratocystidaceae genome sequences, as well as the H. savannae genome sequenced here, allowed for the identification of novel GH32-like sequences. The de novo assembly of the H. savannae draft genome consisted of 28.54 megabases that coded for 7 687 putative genes of which one represented a GH32 family member. The number of GH32 gene family members appeared to be related to the ecological adaptations of these fungi. The pathogenic Ceratocystis species all contained two GH32 family genes (a putative cell wall and a putative vacuolar invertase), while the saprophytic Huntiella species had only one of these genes (a putative cell wall invertase). Further analysis showed that the evolution of the GH32 gene family in the Ceratocystidaceae involved transposable element-based retro-transposition and translocation. As an example, the activity of a Fot5-like element likely facilitated the assembly of the genomic regions harbouring the GH32 family genes in Ceratocystis. This study provides insight into the evolutionary history of the GH32 gene family in Ceratocystidaceae. Our findings suggest that transposable elements shaped the evolution of the GH32 gene family, which in turn determines the sucrolytic activities and related ecological strategies of the Ceratocystidaceae species that harbour them. The study also provides insights into the role of carbohydrate-active enzymes in plant-fungal interactions and adds to our understanding of the evolution of these enzymes and their role in the life style of these fungi.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 42 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 35%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 9%
Student > Master 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 21%
Computer Science 3 7%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2020.
All research outputs
#8,779,525
of 16,649,729 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,705
of 2,776 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,201
of 370,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#118
of 231 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,649,729 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,776 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 370,936 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 231 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.