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Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum parasite by microsatellite markers after scale-up of insecticide-treated bed nets in western Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, December 2015
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Title
Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum parasite by microsatellite markers after scale-up of insecticide-treated bed nets in western Kenya
Published in
Malaria Journal, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-1003-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wangeci Gatei, John E. Gimnig, William Hawley, Feiko ter Kuile, Christopher Odero, Nnaemeka C. Iriemenam, Monica P. Shah, Penelope Phillips Howard, Yusuf O. Omosun, Dianne J. Terlouw, Bernard Nahlen, Laurence Slutsker, Mary J. Hamel, Simon Kariuki, Edward Walker, Ya Ping Shi

Abstract

An initial study of genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Asembo, western Kenya showed that the parasite maintained overall genetic stability 5 years after insecticide-treated bed net (ITN) introduction in 1997. This study investigates further the genetic diversity of P. falciparum 10 years after initial ITN introduction in the same study area and compares this with two other neighbouring areas, where ITNs were introduced in 1998 (Gem) and 2004 (Karemo). From a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2007, 235 smear-positive blood samples collected from children ≤15-year-old in the original study area and two comparison areas were genotyped employing eight neutral microsatellites. Differences in multiple infections, allele frequency, parasite genetic diversity and parasite population structure between the three areas were assessed. Further, molecular data reported previously (1996 and 2001) were compared to the 2007 results in the original study area Asembo. Overall proportion of multiple infections (MA) declined with time in the original study area Asembo (from 95.9 %-2001 to 87.7 %-2007). In the neighbouring areas, MA was lower in the site where ITNs were introduced in 1998 (Gem 83.7 %) compared to where they were introduced in 2004 (Karemo 96.7 %) in 2007. Overall mean allele count (MAC ~ 2.65) and overall unbiased heterozygosity (H e  ~ 0.77) remained unchanged in 1996, 2001 and 2007 in Asembo and was the same level across the two neighbouring areas in 2007. Overall parasite population differentiation remained low over time and in the three areas at FST < 0.04. Both pairwise and multilocus linkage disequilibrium showed limited to no significant association between alleles in Asembo (1996, 2001 and 2007) and between three areas. This study showed the P. falciparum high genetic diversity and parasite population resilience on samples collected 10 years apart and in different areas in western Kenya. The results highlight the need for long-term molecular monitoring after implementation and use of combined and intensive prevention and intervention measures in the region.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 23%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 10%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 11 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2015.
All research outputs
#4,996,455
of 6,737,133 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,868
of 2,323 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,512
of 283,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#114
of 161 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,737,133 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,323 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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