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The anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex are associated with avoidance of dental treatment based on prior experience of treatment in healthy adults

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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46 Mendeley
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Title
The anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex are associated with avoidance of dental treatment based on prior experience of treatment in healthy adults
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12868-015-0224-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chia-Shu Lin, Shih-Yun Wu, Long-Ting Wu

Abstract

Fear concerning stressful medical or dental procedures is one of the major factors that distance patients from health care. Fear and avoidance of dental treatments can be shaped by a patient's prior experience with receiving dental procedures or by imagining the procedures. We performed two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments to investigate the role of the anterior insula (aINS) and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), which are both critical to threat perception, in dental avoidance. Dental avoidance based on both prior treatment experience and imagination was assessed using a customized questionnaire. In an fMRI task-based study, we investigated brain activation in 17 healthy participants when they viewed images depicting dental procedures that evoked a moderate degree of fear. Region-of-interest analysis was performed to assess the association between dental avoidance and aINS as well as dACC activation. In a resting state fMRI study, we investigated 18 healthy participants for the association between the intrinsic functional connectivity of the aINS and dACC and dental avoidance. We found that (1) the participants showed a higher activation of the right aINS and bilateral dACC when they viewed images of dental procedures compared with the brain activation observed when they viewed scrambled images (p < 0.05 corrected for small volume and family-wise error). (2) The avoidance ratings based on prior experience of dental treatment were significantly positively correlated with the activation in the right aINS (r = 0.67, p = 0.003), right dACC (r = 0.65, p = 0.005) and left dACC (r = 0.63, p = 0.007). (3) The intrinsic functional connectivity between the aINS and the orbitofrontal cortex was positively correlated with the avoidance ratings based on experience (uncorrected p < 0.001). The findings highlight prior experience of dental treatment as a predominant factor in shaping patients' avoidance behavior. Individual differences in threat perception may play a key role in the development of dental avoidance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Student > Master 7 15%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Other 5 11%
Other 10 22%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 12 26%
Psychology 11 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2015.
All research outputs
#6,539,575
of 11,426,369 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#441
of 946 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,181
of 314,974 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#15
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,426,369 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 946 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 314,974 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.