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Expression profiling and functional analysis of Toll‐like receptors in primary healthy human nasal epithelial cells shows no correlation and a refractory LPS response

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Allergy, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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17 Dimensions

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Expression profiling and functional analysis of Toll‐like receptors in primary healthy human nasal epithelial cells shows no correlation and a refractory LPS response
Published in
Clinical and Translational Allergy, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13601-015-0086-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Tongeren, K. I. L. Röschmann, S. M. Reinartz, S. Luiten, W. J. Fokkens, E. C. Jong, C. M. Drunen

Abstract

Innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on barrier cells like epithelial cells has been shown to influence the regulation of local immune responses. Here we determine expression level variations and functionality of TLRs in nasal epithelial cells from healthy donors. Expression levels of the different TLRs on primary nasal epithelial cells from healthy donors derived from inferior turbinates was determined by RT-PCR. Functionality of the TLRs was determined by stimulation with the respective ligand and evaluation of released mediators by Luminex ELISA. Primary nasal epithelial cells express different levels of TLR1-6 and TLR9. We were unable to detect mRNA of TLR7, TLR8 and TLR10. Stimulation with Poly(I:C) resulted in a significant increased secretion of IL-4, IL-6, RANTES, IP-10, MIP-1β, VEGF, FGF, IL-1RA, IL-2R and G-CSF. Stimulation with PGN only resulted in significant increased production of IL-6, VEGF and IL-1RA. Although the expression of TLR4 and co-stimulatory molecules could be confirmed, primary nasal epithelial cells appeared to be unresponsive to stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed huge individual differences in TLR agonist-induced mediator release, which did not correlate with the respective expression of TLRs. Our data suggest that nasal epithelium seems to have developed a delicate system of discrimination and recognition of microbial patterns. Hypo-responsiveness to LPS could provide a mechanism to dampen the inflammatory response in the nasal mucosa in order to avoid a chronic inflammatory response. Individual, differential expression of TLRs on epithelial cells and functionality in terms of released mediators might be a crucial factor in explaining why some people develop allergies to common inhaled antigens, and others do not.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 26%
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Researcher 2 7%
Other 1 4%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 7 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 7 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2021.
All research outputs
#6,846,229
of 21,948,630 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#367
of 640 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,158
of 407,336 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Allergy
#8
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,948,630 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 640 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 407,336 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.