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Intraurethral co-transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and muscle-derived cells improves the urethral closure

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2018
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Title
Intraurethral co-transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and muscle-derived cells improves the urethral closure
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13287-018-0990-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Burdzinska, Bartosz Dybowski, Weronika Zarychta-Wiśniewska, Agnieszka Kulesza, Marta Butrym, Radoslaw Zagozdzon, Agnieszka Graczyk-Jarzynka, Piotr Radziszewski, Zdzislaw Gajewski, Leszek Paczek

Abstract

Cell therapy constitutes an attractive alternative to treat stress urinary incontinence. Although promising results have been demonstrated in this field, the procedure requires further optimization. The most commonly proposed cell types for intraurethral injections are muscle derived cells (MDCs) and mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSCs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of MDC-MSC co-transplantation into the urethra. Autologous transplantation of labeled MDCs, bone marrow MSCs or co-transplantation of MDC-MSC were performed in aged multiparous female goats (n = 6 in each group). The mean number of cells injected per animal was 29.6 × 106(± 4.3 × 106). PBS-injected animals constituted the control group (n = 5). Each animal underwent urethral pressure profile (UPP) measurements before and after the injection procedure. The maximal urethral closure pressure (MUCP) and functional area (FA) of UPPs were calculated. The urethras were collected at the 28th or the 84th day after transplantation. The marker fluorochrome (DID) was visualized and quantified using in vivo imaging system in whole explants. Myogenic differentiation of the graft was immunohistochemically evaluated. The grafted cells were identified in all urethras collected at day 28 regardless of injected cell type. At this time point the strongest DID-derived signal (normalized to the number of injected cells) was noted in the co-transplanted group. There was a distinct decline in signal intensity between day 28 and day 84 in all types of transplantation. Both MSCs and MDCs contributed to striated muscle formation if transplanted directly to the external urethral sphincter. In the MSC group those events were rare. If cells were injected into the submucosal region they remained undifferentiated usually packed in clearly distinguishable depots. The mean increase in MUCP after transplantation in comparison to the pre-transplantation state in the MDC, MSC and MDC-MSC groups was 12.3% (± 11.2%, not significant (ns)), 8.2% (± 9.6%, ns) and 24.1% (± 3.1%, p = 0.02), respectively. The mean increase in FA after transplantation in the MDC, MSC and MDC-MSC groups amounted to 17.8% (± 15.4%, ns), 15.2% (± 12.9%, ns) and 17.8% (± 2.5%, p = 0.04), respectively. The results suggest that MDC-MSC co-transplantation provides a greater chance of improvement in urethral closure than transplantation of each population alone.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 18%
Student > Master 2 12%
Professor 2 12%
Other 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Unknown 5 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 18%
Engineering 2 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 12%
Unspecified 1 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 7 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2018.
All research outputs
#8,516,169
of 13,568,727 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#694
of 1,204 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,110
of 265,491 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,568,727 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,204 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,491 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them