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Exploring physiotherapists’ personality traits that may influence treatment outcome in patients with chronic diseases: a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

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103 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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100 Mendeley
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Title
Exploring physiotherapists’ personality traits that may influence treatment outcome in patients with chronic diseases: a cohort study
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-1225-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisah Margretha Buining, Margit K. Kooijman, Ilse C. S. Swinkels, Martijn F. Pisters, Cindy Veenhof

Abstract

During treatment of patients with Chronic Diseases (CD) the therapist-patient interaction is often intense, and the strategies used during treatment require physiotherapists to assume a coaching role. Uncovering therapist factors that explain inter-therapist variation might provide tools to improve treatment outcome and to train future therapists. The purpose of this study was to explore the so-called 'therapist-effect', by looking at the influence of intrinsic therapist factors, specifically personality traits, on treatment outcome in patients with CD. A cohort study was performed using data from the NIVEL Primary Care Database (NPCD) in 2011-2012 and an additional questionnaire. Patients with CD (n = 393) treated by Dutch physiotherapists working in outpatient practices (n = 39) were included. Patient and treatment outcome variables were extracted from NPCD. The course of complaint was measured using the Numeric Rating Scale. Therapist variables were measured using a questionnaire consisting of demographics and the Big Five traits: Extraversion, Neuroticism, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness and Openness to experiences. Data were analysed using multilevel linear regression. Only Neuroticism was found to be significant (Neuroticism F = 0.71, P = 0.01; therapist gender F = 0.72, P = 0.03; life events F = -0.54, P = 0.09; patient gender F = -0.43, P = 0.10; patient age F = 0.01, P = 0.27). Subgroup analyses of 180 patients with Osteoarthritis and 30 therapists showed similar results. There are indications that patients with CD who are treated by therapists who tend to be calmer, more relaxed, secure and resilient have a greater reduction in severity of complaints compared to patients treated by therapists who show less of these traits. Being a male therapist and having experienced life events influence outcome positively. However, more extensive research is needed to validate the current findings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 103 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 96 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Other 11 11%
Researcher 8 8%
Other 19 19%
Unknown 19 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 30 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 28%
Psychology 5 5%
Sports and Recreations 4 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 2%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 21 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 68. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2022.
All research outputs
#465,125
of 20,947,528 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#78
of 6,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,312
of 401,689 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#6
of 308 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,947,528 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,968 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 401,689 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 308 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.