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Evidence for the free radical/oxidative stress theory of ageing from the CHANCES consortium: a meta-analysis of individual participant data

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
77 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence for the free radical/oxidative stress theory of ageing from the CHANCES consortium: a meta-analysis of individual participant data
Published in
BMC Medicine, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0537-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ben Schöttker, Hermann Brenner, Eugène HJM Jansen, Julian Gardiner, Anne Peasey, Růžena Kubínová, Andrzej Pająk, Roman Topor-Madry, Abdonas Tamosiunas, Kai-Uwe Saum, Bernd Holleczek, Hynek Pikhart, Martin Bobak

Abstract

The free radical/oxidative stress theory of ageing has received considerable attention, but the evidence on the association of oxidative stress markers with mortality is sparse. We measured derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolite (D-ROM) levels as a proxy for the reactive oxygen species concentration and total thiol levels (TTL) as a proxy for the redox control status in 10,622 men and women (age range, 45-85 years), from population-based cohorts from Germany, Poland, Czech Republic, and Lithuania, of whom 1,702 died during follow-up. Both oxidative stress markers were significantly associated with all-cause mortality independently from established risk factors (including inflammation) and from each other in all cohorts. Regarding cause-specific mortality, compared to low D-ROM levels (≤340 Carr U), very high D-ROM levels (>500 Carr U) were strongly associated with both cardiovascular (relative risk (RR), 5.09; 95 % CI, 2.67-9.69) and cancer mortality (RR, 4.34; 95 % CI, 2.31-8.16). TTL was only associated with CVD mortality (RR, 1.30; 95 % CI, 1.15-1.48, for one-standard-deviation-decrease). The strength of the association of TTL with CVD mortality increased with age of the participants (RR for one-standard-deviation-decrease in those aged 70-85 years was 1.65; 95 % CI, 1.22-2.24). In these four population-based cohort studies from Central and Eastern Europe, the oxidative stress serum markers D-ROM and TTL were independently and strongly associated with all-cause and CVD mortality. In addition, D-ROM levels were also strongly associated with cancer mortality. This study provides epidemiological evidence supporting the free radical/oxidative stress theory of ageing and suggests that d-ROMs and TTL are useful oxidative stress markers associated with premature mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 89 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Other 6 7%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 18 20%
Unknown 31 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Other 17 19%
Unknown 36 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2021.
All research outputs
#694,651
of 20,981,820 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#502
of 3,075 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,386
of 401,928 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#60
of 296 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,981,820 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,075 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 401,928 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 296 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.