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Reduction in low-dose to normal tissue with the addition of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in breast cancer patients with implant reconstruction…

Overview of attention for article published in Radiation Oncology, September 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

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1 news outlet
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Citations

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46 Dimensions

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Reduction in low-dose to normal tissue with the addition of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in breast cancer patients with implant reconstruction receiving regional nodal irradiation
Published in
Radiation Oncology, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13014-018-1132-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vishruta A. Dumane, Kitwadee Saksornchai, Ying Zhou, Linda Hong, Simon Powell, Alice Y. Ho

Abstract

Despite dosimetric benefits of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in breast cancer patients with implant reconstruction receiving regional nodal irradiation (RNI), low dose to the thoracic structures remains a concern. Our goal was to report dosimetric effects of adding deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) to VMAT in left-sided breast cancer patients with tissue expander (TE)/permanent implant (PI) reconstruction receiving RNI. Ten consecutive breast cancer patients with unilateral or bilateral TE/PI reconstruction who were treated with a combination of VMAT and DIBH to the left reconstructed chest wall and regional nodes were prospectively identified. Free breathing (FB) and DIBH CT scans were acquired for each patient. VMAT plans for the same arc geometry were compared for FB versus DIBH. Prescription dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dosimetric differences were tested for statistical significance. For comparable coverage and target dose homogeneity, the mean dose to the heart reduced on average by 2.9 Gy (8.2 to 5.3 Gy), with the addition of DIBH (p < 0.05). The maximum dose to the left anterior descending (LAD) artery was reduced by 9.9 Gy (p < 0.05), which related closely to the reduction in the maximum heart dose (9.4 Gy). V05 Gy to the heart, ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung and total lung (p < 0.05) decreased on average by 29.6%, 5.8%, 15.4% and 10.8% respectively. No significant differences were seen in the ipsilateral lung V20 Gy or mean dose as well as in the mean contralateral breast/implant dose. However, V04 Gy and V03 Gy of the contralateral breast/implant were respectively reduced by 13.2% and 18.3% using DIBH (p < 0.05). Combination of VMAT and DIBH showed significant dosimetric gains for low dose to the heart, lungs and contralateral breast/implant. Not surprisingly, the mean and maximum dose to the heart and to the LAD were also reduced. DIBH should be considered with the use of VMAT in breast cancer patients with implant reconstructions receiving RNI.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 7 11%
Other 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 21 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Physics and Astronomy 3 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 24 38%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2022.
All research outputs
#2,436,259
of 23,275,636 outputs
Outputs from Radiation Oncology
#51
of 2,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,817
of 341,384 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Radiation Oncology
#1
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,275,636 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,091 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,384 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.