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Mortality of older persons living alone: Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Studies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Geriatrics, October 2015
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Title
Mortality of older persons living alone: Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Studies
Published in
BMC Geriatrics, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12877-015-0128-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tze Pin Ng, Aizhen Jin, Liang Feng, Ma Shwe Zin Nyunt, Khuan Yew Chow, Lei Feng, Ngan Phoon Fong

Abstract

We investigated the association of living alone with mortality among older persons, independently of marital, health and other factors, and explored its effect modification by age group, sex, marital status and physical functional disability. Using data from 8 years of mortality follow up (1 September 2003 to 31 December 2011) of 2553 participants in the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Studies (SLAS) cohort, we estimated hazard ratio (HR) of mortality associated with living alone using Cox proportional hazard models. At baseline, 7.4 % (N = 189) of the participants were living alone, and 227 (8.9 %) died during the follow up period. Living alone was significantly associated with mortality 1.66 (95 % CI, 1.05-2.63), controlling for health status (hypertension, diabetes, chronic lung disease, stroke, heart disease, kidney failure, IADL-ADL disability and depressive symptoms), marital status and other variables (age, sex, housing type). Possible substantive effect modification by sex (p for interaction = 0.106) and marital status (p for interaction <0.115) were observed: higher among men (HR = 2.36, 95 % CI, 1.24-4.49) than women (HR = 1.14, 95 % CI, 0.58-2.22), and among single, divorce or widowed (HR = 2.26, 95 % CI, 1.24-4.10) than married individuals (HR = 0.83, 95 % CI, 0.30-2.31). Living alone was associated with increased mortality, independently of marital, health and other variables. The impact of living alone on mortality appeared to be stronger among men and those who were single, divorced or married.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 141 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 141 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 26 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 13%
Student > Master 13 9%
Researcher 12 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 31 22%
Unknown 33 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 15%
Social Sciences 14 10%
Psychology 12 9%
Unspecified 7 5%
Other 21 15%
Unknown 40 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2015.
All research outputs
#18,432,465
of 22,835,198 outputs
Outputs from BMC Geriatrics
#2,631
of 3,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,816
of 279,239 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Geriatrics
#27
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,835,198 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,189 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,239 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.