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Open and Calm – A randomized controlled trial evaluating a public stress reduction program in Denmark

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, December 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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175 Mendeley
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Title
Open and Calm – A randomized controlled trial evaluating a public stress reduction program in Denmark
Published in
BMC Public Health, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2588-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christian G. Jensen, Jon Lansner, Anders Petersen, Signe A. Vangkilde, Signe P. Ringkøbing, Vibe G. Frokjaer, Dea Adamsen, Gitte M. Knudsen, John W. Denninger, Steen G. Hasselbalch

Abstract

Prolonged psychological stress is a risk factor for illness and constitutes an increasing public health challenge creating a need to develop public interventions specifically targeting stress and promoting mental health. The present randomized controlled trial evaluated health effects of a novel program: Relaxation-Response-based Mental Health Promotion (RR-MHP). The multimodal, meditation-based course was publicly entitled "Open and Calm" (OC) because it consistently trained relaxed and receptive ("Open") attention, and consciously non-intervening ("Calm") witnessing, in two standardized formats (individual or group) over nine weeks. Seventy-two participants who complained to their general practitioner about reduced daily functioning due to prolonged stress or who responded to an online health survey on stress were randomly assigned to OC formats or treatment as usual, involving e.g., unstandardized consultations with their general practitioner. Outcomes included perceived stress, depressive symptoms, quality of life, sleep disturbances, mental health, salivary cortisol, and visual perception. Control variables comprised a genetic stress-resiliency factor (serotonergic transporter genotype; 5-HTTLPR), demographics, personality, self-reported inattentiveness, and course format. Intent-to-treat analyses showed significantly larger improvements in OC than in controls on all outcomes. Treatment effects on self-reported outcomes were sustained after 3 months and were not related to age, gender, education, or course format. The dropout rate was only 6 %. The standardized OC program reduced stress and improved mental health for a period of 3 months. Further testing of the OC program for public mental health promotion and reduction of stress-related illnesses is therefore warranted. A larger implementation is in progress. ClinicalTrials.gov.: NCT02140307. Registered May 14 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 175 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 173 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 17%
Student > Bachelor 26 15%
Student > Master 23 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 7%
Other 32 18%
Unknown 34 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 41 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 10%
Neuroscience 12 7%
Social Sciences 8 5%
Other 26 15%
Unknown 42 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2016.
All research outputs
#9,366,996
of 17,041,326 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,101
of 11,519 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,351
of 372,709 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#671
of 1,121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,041,326 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,519 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 372,709 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.