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Parturition dysfunction in obesity: time to target the pathobiology

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 X users

Citations

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82 Dimensions

Readers on

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157 Mendeley
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Title
Parturition dysfunction in obesity: time to target the pathobiology
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12958-015-0129-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicole S. Carlson, Teri L. Hernandez, K. Joseph Hurt

Abstract

Over a third of women of childbearing age in the United States are obese, and during pregnancy they are at increased risk for delayed labor onset and slow labor progress that often results in unplanned cesarean delivery. The biology behind this dysfunctional parturition is not well understood. Studies of obesity-induced changes in parturition physiology may facilitate approaches to optimize labor in obese women. In this review, we summarize known and proposed biologic effects of obesity on labor preparation, contraction/synchronization, and endurance, drawing on both clinical observation and experimental data. We present evidence from human and animal studies of interactions between obesity and parturition signaling in all elements of the birth process, including: delayed cervical ripening, prostaglandin insensitivity, amniotic membrane strengthening, decreased myometrial oxytocin receptor expression, decreased myocyte action potential initiation and contractility, decreased myocyte gap junction formation, and impaired myocyte neutralization of reactive oxygen species. We found convincing clinical data on the effect of obesity on labor initiation and successful delivery, but few studies on the underlying pathobiology. We suggest research opportunities and therapeutic interventions based on plausible biologic mechanisms.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Israel 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 155 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 15%
Student > Bachelor 21 13%
Researcher 12 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 8%
Student > Postgraduate 11 7%
Other 33 21%
Unknown 44 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 57 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 4%
Engineering 6 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Other 14 9%
Unknown 52 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2015.
All research outputs
#13,699,949
of 23,940,793 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#438
of 1,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,393
of 395,023 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#6
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,940,793 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,042 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 395,023 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.