↓ Skip to main content

Serotonin transporter clustering in blood lymphocytes predicts the outcome on anhedonia scores in naïve depressive patients treated with antidepressant medication

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of General Psychiatry, December 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Serotonin transporter clustering in blood lymphocytes predicts the outcome on anhedonia scores in naïve depressive patients treated with antidepressant medication
Published in
Annals of General Psychiatry, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12991-015-0085-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tania Rivera-Baltanas, Roberto Carlos Agis-Balboa, Raquel Romay-Tallon, Lisa E. Kalynchuk, Jose Manuel Olivares, Hector J. Caruncho

Abstract

We have shown that serotonin transporter (SERT) clustering in blood lymphocytes is altered in major depression and correlates with pharmacological therapeutic responses measured with the Hamilton scale. In the present report, we extend these results to the self-assessment anhedonia scale, as anhedonia is a cardinal symptom of major depression that is difficult to treat with first-line antidepressants. We collected blood samples from 38 untreated depression patients at the time of enrolment and 8 weeks after pharmacological treatment. We used the self-assessment anhedonia scale to evaluate anhedonia symptoms before and after treatment. We also used quantitative immunocytochemistry to measure SERT clusters in blood lymphocytes. Evaluation of the distribution of SERT clusters size in the plasma membrane of lymphocytes identified two subpopulations of naive depression patients: Depression I (D-I) and Depression II (D-II). While naïve D-I and D-II patients initially showed similar anhedonia scores, D-II patients showed a good response in anhedonia symptoms after 8 weeks of psychopharmacological treatment, whereas D-I patients failed to show any improvement. Psychopharmacological treatment also induced an increase in the number of SERT clusters in lymphocytes in the D-II group, and this increase correlated with the improvement in anhedonia symptoms. SERT clustering in peripheral lymphocytes can be used to identify patient response to antidepressant therapy as ascertained by anhedonia scores.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 22%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Other 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 24%
Neuroscience 10 20%
Psychology 6 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 December 2015.
All research outputs
#9,126,070
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Annals of General Psychiatry
#202
of 362 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,880
of 363,748 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of General Psychiatry
#21
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 362 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 363,748 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.