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Scented grasses in Norway—identity and uses

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, December 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

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8 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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20 Mendeley
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Title
Scented grasses in Norway—identity and uses
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0070-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Torbjørn Alm

Abstract

Some grass species are richer in coumarin and thus more sweetly scented than others. These have been eagerly sought after in parts of Norway, but the tradition has been weakly documented, both in terms of the species collected, their vernacular names, and uses. Based on literature data and a substantial body of information collected during my own ethnobotanical field work, artefacts and voucher specimens, the grass species are identified, and their uses clarified. In Norwegian literature, the tradition of collecting and using scented grasses has received little attention, and past authors largely refer it to Anthoxanthum spp. The tradition's concentration to the Sámi strongholds of northernmost Norway, and most authors' lacking knowledge of the Sámi language, have contributed to the weak and misleading coverage in previous publications. Coumarin-rich grass species are well known in folk tradition in northernmost Norway, as luktegress (Norwegian, "scent grass"), háissasuoidni (North Sámi, "scent grass"), hajuheinä (Finnish, "scent grass"), or similar terms. They have been (and still are) frequently collected, and used as perfume, for storing with clothes, and a number of other purposes. Despite literature records identifying the species used as Anthoxanthum odoratum coll. (including A. nipponicum), the main source utilized in North Norway is Hierochloë odorata, both ssp. arctica and ssp. odorata. Anthoxanthum nipponicum and Milium effusum are alternative, but infrequently used sources of material, depending on local tradition and availability. By far the most important grass species hiding behind the "scented grass" tradition in Norway is Hierochloë odorata. Anthoxanthum nipponicum is also used, but much less frequently, and only a single record confirms the use of Milium effusum. Only the foliage of Hierochloë provides suitable material for making traditional braids. The three major ethnic groups in Norway have all utilized scented grasses as perfume and for storing with clothes, but the tradition's geographical concentration to the far north of Norway (Finnmark and NE Troms), suggests that it has originally mainly been a Sámi tradition, adopted by their neighbours.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 25%
Researcher 3 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 15%
Librarian 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 35%
Social Sciences 4 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 15%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2018.
All research outputs
#4,446,344
of 18,883,809 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#157
of 694 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,018
of 385,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#15
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,883,809 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 694 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 385,103 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.