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Engineering transcription factors to improve tolerance against alkane biofuels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, December 2015
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2 tweeters

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13 Dimensions

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Engineering transcription factors to improve tolerance against alkane biofuels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13068-015-0411-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hua Ling, Nina Kurniasih Pratomo Juwono, Wei Suong Teo, Ruirui Liu, Susanna Su Jan Leong, Matthew Wook Chang

Abstract

Biologically produced alkanes can be used as 'drop in' to existing transportation infrastructure as alkanes are important components of gasoline and jet fuels. Despite the reported microbial production of alkanes, the toxicity of alkanes to microbial hosts could pose a bottleneck for high productivity. In this study, we aimed to improve the tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model eukaryotic host of industrial significance, to alkane biofuels. To increase alkane tolerance in S. cerevisiae, we sought to exploit the pleiotropic drug resistance (Pdr) transcription factors Pdr1p and Pdr3p, which are master regulators of genes with pleiotropic drug resistance elements (PDREs)-containing upstream sequences. Wild-type and site-mutated Pdr1p and Pdr3p were expressed in S. cerevisiae BY4741 pdr1Δ pdr3Δ (BYL13). The point mutations of PDR1 (F815S) and PDR3 (Y276H) in BYL13 resulted in the highest tolerance to C10 alkane, and the expression of wild-type PDR3 in BYL13 led to the highest tolerance to C11 alkane. To identify and verify the correlation between the Pdr transcription factors and tolerance improvement, we analyzed the expression patterns of genes regulated by the Pdr transcription factors in the most tolerant strains against C10 and C11 alkanes. Quantitative PCR results showed that the Pdr transcription factors differentially regulated genes associated with multi-drug resistance, stress responses, and membrane modifications, suggesting different extents of intracellular alkane levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and membrane integrity. We further showed that (i) the expression of Pdr1mt1 + Pdr3mt reduced intracellular C10 alkane by 67 % and ROS by 53 %, and significantly alleviated membrane damage; and (ii) the expression of the Pdr3wt reduced intracellular C11 alkane by 72 % and ROS by 21 %. Alkane transport assays also revealed that the reduction of alkane accumulation was due to higher export (C10 and C11 alkanes) and lower import (C11 alkane). We improved yeast's tolerance to alkane biofuels by modulating the expression of the wild-type and site-mutated Pdr1p and Pdr3p, and extensively identified the correlation between Pdr transcription factors and tolerance improvement by analyzing gene patterns, alkane transport, ROS, and membrane integrity. These findings provide valuable insights into manipulating transcription factors in yeast for improved alkane tolerance and productivity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 2%
China 1 2%
Thailand 1 2%
Unknown 46 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 24%
Student > Bachelor 10 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Student > Master 5 10%
Professor 4 8%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 31%
Chemical Engineering 4 8%
Engineering 4 8%
Chemistry 3 6%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#3,381,394
of 6,897,266 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#268
of 538 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,747
of 301,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#34
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,897,266 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 538 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,369 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.