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Poor drug adherence and lack of awareness of hypertension among hypertensive stroke patients in Kampala, Uganda: a cross sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2016
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Title
Poor drug adherence and lack of awareness of hypertension among hypertensive stroke patients in Kampala, Uganda: a cross sectional study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1830-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Isaac Mugwano, Mark Kaddumukasa, Levi Mugenyi, James Kayima, Edward Ddumba, Martha Sajatovic, Cathy Sila, Michael DeGeorgia, Elly Katabira

Abstract

Raised blood pressure (BP) remains an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as stroke. Adherence to therapeutic recommendations especially antihypertensive drugs is important in BP control. The aim of the study was to assess the stroke risk factors and levels of adherence among hypertensive patients with stroke in Kampala Uganda. In a cross-sectional study we describe 112 hypertensive subjects with stroke from two Kampala city hospitals. A standardized pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect medical history, clinical details, radiological findings and laboratory data. A total of 112 hypertensive subjects with stroke were enrolled between May 2013 and April 2014. The median ages were 63.5 years (52.5-75.0) for the cases. Seventy percent (78/112) of the study participants had ischemic strokes. Only 17 % were adherent to anti-hypertensive medications. The main cause of non-adherence appears to be lack of knowledge. Poor adherence of anti-hypertensive medications among hypertensive patients remains a big challenge in our setting. This has been attributed to lack of adequate knowledge and cost of the prescribed drugs. There is therefore an urgent need to promptly diagnose and educate hypertensive patients with emphasis on adherence to anti hypertensive drugs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 146 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 145 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 14%
Student > Bachelor 20 14%
Student > Postgraduate 16 11%
Researcher 14 10%
Lecturer 9 6%
Other 26 18%
Unknown 40 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 30 21%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 4%
Social Sciences 6 4%
Engineering 4 3%
Other 15 10%
Unknown 42 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2016.
All research outputs
#18,681,024
of 23,146,350 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#3,041
of 4,292 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#285,447
of 394,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#109
of 148 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,146,350 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,292 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 394,360 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 148 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.