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A cross-sectional study on quality of life among the elderly in non-governmental organizations’ elderly homes in Kuala Lumpur

Overview of attention for article published in Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, January 2016
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Citations

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Title
A cross-sectional study on quality of life among the elderly in non-governmental organizations’ elderly homes in Kuala Lumpur
Published in
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12955-016-0408-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Obinna Francis Onunkwor, Sami Abdo Radman Al-Dubai, Philip Parikial George, John Arokiasamy, Hemetram Yadav, Ankur Barua, Hassana Ojonuba Shuaibu

Abstract

There is a rapid increase in the population of the elderly globally, and Malaysia is anticipated to become an ageing nation in 2030. Maintaining health, social participation, reducing institutionalization, and improving quality of life of the elderly are public health challenges of the 21(st) century. Quality of life among elderly in Elderly Homes in Malaysia is under researched. This study aims to determine the quality of life and its associated factors among the Elderly in Elderly Homes in Kuala Lumpur. This was a cross-sectional study among 203 residents aged 60 years or more in eight randomly selected Elderly Homes in Kuala Lumpur in September 2014. Stratified simple random sampling was used to select participants. Study instruments included World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF), Multidimensional Scale for Perceived Social Support, and a questionnaire for Socio-demographic variables. Data collection was by face to face interview. Univariate and Multivariate analysis were used to determine associations, and P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The mean (Standard deviation) for the physical domain was 14.3 (±2.7), 13.7 (±2.5) for the psychological domain, 10.8 (±3.4) for the social domain, and 13.0 (±2.5) for the environment domain. Factors significantly associated with quality of life included age, gender, level of education, economic status, outdoor leisure activity, physical activity, duration of residence, type of accommodation, co-morbidities, and social support. This study confirms that multiple factors are associated with quality of life among elderly in elderly homes. Social support, chronic co-morbidities, gender and outdoor leisure activity were significantly associated with all the domains of quality of life. Among the four domains of quality of life, the physical domain had the highest score while the social domain had the lowest score. This emphasizes the need for more social support-related interventions in these homes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 254 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 254 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 47 19%
Student > Master 34 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 11%
Researcher 23 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 6%
Other 41 16%
Unknown 65 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 55 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 49 19%
Social Sciences 24 9%
Psychology 15 6%
Sports and Recreations 9 4%
Other 31 12%
Unknown 71 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2016.
All research outputs
#12,269,524
of 15,442,255 outputs
Outputs from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#1,163
of 1,660 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#255,718
of 371,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#82
of 149 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,442,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,660 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,065 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 149 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.