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Confirming mental health care in acute psychiatric wards, as narrated by persons experiencing psychotic illness: an interview study.

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Nursing, January 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
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Title
Confirming mental health care in acute psychiatric wards, as narrated by persons experiencing psychotic illness: an interview study.
Published in
BMC Nursing, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12912-016-0126-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sebergsen, Karina, Norberg, Astrid, Talseth, Anne-Grethe, Karina Sebergsen, Astrid Norberg, Anne-Grethe Talseth

Abstract

It is important that mental health nurses meet the safety, security and care needs of persons suffering from psychotic illness to enhance these persons' likelihood of feeling better during their time in acute psychiatric wards. Certain persons in care describe nurses' mental health care as positive, whereas others report negative experiences and express a desire for improvements. There is limited research on how persons with psychotic illness experience nurses' mental health care acts and how such acts help these persons feel better. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore, describe and understand how the mental health nurses in acute psychiatric wards provide care that helps persons who experienced psychotic illness to feel better, as narrated by these persons. This study had a qualitative design; 12 persons participated in qualitative interviews. The interviews were transcribed, content analysed and interpreted using Martin Buber's concept of confirmation. The results of this study show three categories of confirming mental health care that describe what helped the participants to feel better step-by-step: first, being confirmed as a person experiencing psychotic illness in need of endurance; second, being confirmed as a person experiencing psychotic illness in need of decreased psychotic symptoms; and third, being confirmed as a person experiencing psychotic illness in need of support in daily life. The underlying meaning of the categories and of subcategories were interpreted and formulated as the theme; confirming mental health care to persons experiencing psychotic illness. Confirming mental health care acts seem to help persons to feel better in a step-wise manner during psychotic illness. Nurses' openness and sensitivity to the changing care needs of persons who suffer from psychotic illness create moments of confirmation within caring acts that concretely help the persons to feel better and that may enhance their health. The results show the importance of taking the experiential knowledge of persons who have experienced psychotic illness seriously to develop and increase the quality of mental health care in acute psychiatric wards.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 22%
Student > Master 7 16%
Lecturer 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 13 29%
Psychology 7 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Social Sciences 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2016.
All research outputs
#4,063,008
of 8,594,027 outputs
Outputs from BMC Nursing
#164
of 291 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,333
of 326,113 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Nursing
#9
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,594,027 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 291 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 326,113 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.