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Natural environments, nature relatedness and the ecological theater: connecting satellites and sequencing to shinrin-yoku

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 451)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
45 X users

Citations

dimensions_citation
42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
177 Mendeley
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Title
Natural environments, nature relatedness and the ecological theater: connecting satellites and sequencing to shinrin-yoku
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40101-016-0083-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey M. Craig, Alan C. Logan, Susan L. Prescott

Abstract

Recent advances in research concerning the public health value of natural environments have been remarkable. The growing interest in this topic (often housed under terms such as green and/or blue space) has been occurring in parallel with the microbiome revolution and an increased use of remote sensing technology in public health. In the context of biodiversity loss, rapid urbanization, and alarming rates of global non-communicable diseases (many associated with chronic, low-grade inflammation), discussions of natural vis-a-vis built environments are not merely fodder for intellectual curiosity. Here, we argue for increased interdisciplinary collaboration with the aim of better understanding the mechanisms-including aerobiological and epigenetic-that might help explain some of the noted positive health outcomes. It is our contention that some of these mechanisms are related to ecodiversity (i.e., the sum of biodiversity and geodiversity, including biotic and abiotic constituents). We also encourage researchers to more closely examine individual nature relatedness and how it might influence many outcomes that are at the interface of lifestyle habits and contact with ecodiversity.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 177 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 173 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 14%
Researcher 22 12%
Student > Master 20 11%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 6%
Other 36 20%
Unknown 45 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 25 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 6%
Psychology 9 5%
Other 47 27%
Unknown 56 32%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 63. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2023.
All research outputs
#677,054
of 25,371,288 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#27
of 451 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,941
of 401,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#1
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,371,288 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 451 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 401,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them