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Chronic intermittent abdominal pain in young woman with intestinal malrotation, Fitz-Hugh-Curtis Syndrome and appendiceal neuroendocrine tumor: a rare case report and literature review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, January 2016
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Title
Chronic intermittent abdominal pain in young woman with intestinal malrotation, Fitz-Hugh-Curtis Syndrome and appendiceal neuroendocrine tumor: a rare case report and literature review
Published in
BMC Women's Health, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12905-015-0274-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alessia Cusimano, Ahmed Mohammed Alaaeldien Beniamin Abdelghany, Andrea Donadini

Abstract

There are a lot of different causes of abdominal pain; in this case, a young woman suffers from three diseases with similar symptoms. Adult intestinal mal-rotation is a rare condition of deviation from the normal 270° counter clockwise rotation of the midgut resulting in, not only mal-position of the small intestine, but also mal-fixation of the mesentery. Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome is a rare complication of pelvic inflammatory disease; it involves liver capsule inflammation associated with genital tract infection, which is usually caused by Neisseria gonorrhoea and Chlamydia trachomatis. Neuroendocrine tumors are enterochromaffin cell neoplasms that arise from cells of the endocrine (hormonal) and nervous systems; the appendicular one is the most common primary malignant lesion of these tumors, it's incidence is about 0.3 - 0.9 % of appendectomies done. Just for knowledge, this is the first described case of concomitant presence of all these diseases with clinical symptoms attributable to each one. 40-years-old woman suffers from acute abdominal pain, predominantly on the right quadrants, without abdominal distension, no guarding nor rigidity and normal intestinal peristalsis. She has a long history of abdominal intermittent pain, with cramps every 30-40 min, resolving spontaneously. She was diagnosed as intestinal mal-rotation through computed tomography scan which has evidenced a mobilized intra - peritoneal duodenum with cecum/ascending colon predominately lying on the left side and the small intestine almost entirely lying on the right side of abdomen, without evidence of effusion, edema or signs of intestinal ischemia or infarction. Exploratory laparoscopy demonstrated an inflammatory process in the hepatic-renal space, with bloody adhesions above the liver capsule; this is additional to the typical pelvic inflammatory disease signs (Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome). Appendectomy was performed with histological analysis resulting in appendicular neuroendocrine tumor. Although the patient has an intestinal mal-rotation which could explain the abdominal painful symptoms, it is not possible to exclude other concomitant causes, such as perihepatitis on pelvic inflammatory disease or neuroendocrine tumors. Even if all these diseases are rarely seen in daily clinical practice, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic intermittent abdominal pain in a young woman.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 6 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 60%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2016.
All research outputs
#18,436,183
of 22,840,638 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#1,496
of 1,818 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#283,813
of 392,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#9
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,840,638 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,818 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 392,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.